PAPERhttp://www.nojx.tw/PAPERen-usThu, 25 Apr 2019 21:05:19 -0000https://assets.rbl.ms/19068909/210x.pnghttp://www.nojx.tw/PAPERWatch Carly Rae Jepsen Cover Khalidhttp://www.nojx.tw/carly-rae-jepsen-covers-khalid-2635558052.html

Although Carly Rae Jepsen is busy prepping for her May return to the charts with Dedicated, her first full-length project release since 2015's Emotion, she found some time to stop by the BBC Radio 1 Live Lounge to deliver a brilliant rendition of Khalid's newest smash hit, "Talk." With a few backup singers, and some light head-bob choreography, Jepsen took center stage and sang her heart out to the flirty summer anthem.

None


Related | Carly Rae Jepsen Bops Through Blues on 'Julien'

None


The original version of the song is an absolute groove that utilizes booming kicks to punctuate sizzling keys, and of course, Khalid's godly vocals. Jepsen's version is paired-down, allowing her voice to shine brightly above the '80s synths used in portions of the original song. Each note seems effortless to her; she doesn't just sing a cover, she performs it. Jepsen has the range and control to glide up and down Khalid's melodies, but continue to be playful and engage with Live Lounge watchers through their screens.


None


While nobody will ever be able to match Khalid's spirit on the track, it's electrifying to watch Jepsen inhabit the song and put her unique spin on the pop star's charismatic hit. "Talk" is lifted from Khalid's most recent release, Free Spirit, and it's a standout in good company, preceded on the tracklist by the equally as popular bop, "Better."

None


Fans of Jepsen's will have to wait a few more weeks for her May 17 album release, but until then, this powerhouse of a live performance should hold over stans. Those feeling inclined to see Jepsen work her magic live and in-person can catch her on tour this summer, where she'll be playing an assortment of dates throughout the United States.


None


Photo via YouTube

]]>
Thu, 25 Apr 2019 20:54:01 +0000http://www.nojx.tw/carly-rae-jepsen-covers-khalid-2635558052.htmlCarly rae jepsenKhalidRoytel Montero
Adam Selman Sunnies Look Great With Cute Animalshttp://www.nojx.tw/adam-selman-le-specs-2635543120.html

Poodles, chicks and bunnies are just a few of the snuggly creatures on display alongside Adam Selman's fresh, new frames for Le Specs, out now. The dreamy collaboration is Selman's fourth with the sunglasses company and coincides with their 40th anniversary.

None


To celebrate, the summer collection features four styles, each in an array of colors that channel everything from the high-sheen of muscle cars to the retro flair of a cat-eye. The head-turning sunnies also incorporate sleek lines, lacquered metal, and contoured shapes.

None


Related | Get Your 'ASS' in Shape With Adam Selman Sport

None


As for bringing this collection to life through its gorgeous campaign, Selman's creative inspiration was a long time coming: "The shoot was a dream I've been wanting to do forever," he says. "I might have shed a few tears when it all came together."

None


Drawing inspiration from images like an old National Geographic photo of a baseball player surrounded by baby chicks and an '80s hair crimper advertisement featuring a poodle, Selman brought together a list of references for the perfect campaign. "Everyone was smiling all day long because of the joy the animals brought us," Selman said.

None


None


None


None


None


None


None


None


None


For the designer, this joy is topped only by the immense happiness he feels when seeing people wearing the glasses out and about. "I actually have a folder in my phone of people I've stopped on the street to take their picture wearing them," he says. "It's so great to make a personal connection like that."

None


The drop contains glasses like the Royale, the Luxx, the Coupe, and the Monster. Each with their own definitive style, there's something for everyone from flashy metallic wrap-around frames to sleek double aviators.

None


As for which specs the designer likes the most, his current preference is the Monster: "I love the lines and curve on it," he says. "It looks deceptively simple and familiar, but it's really ferocious once you put it on."

None


Get into the fierce frames, cuddly new campaign and snatch them up at either Opening Ceremony or Le Specs now.


None


Photos courtesy of Adam Selman

]]>
Thu, 25 Apr 2019 20:15:07 +0000http://www.nojx.tw/adam-selman-le-specs-2635543120.htmlAdam selmanLe specsRoytel Montero
Help This New York Designer #PromoteHomosexualityhttp://www.nojx.tw/willie-norris-promote-homosexuality-2635532269.html

It is often said that in times of political strife, artists are called to resist and push back against oppression. Brooklyn artist and designer Willie Norris is one of many answering the call to buck status quos of Trumpian hatred and discrimination.

None


Over the past few years, Norris has pushed an unapologetically pro-queer streetwear aesthetic forward — or "gay agenda," if you will — via unisex tees and merch from his eponymous line, WILLIENORRISWORKSHOP. Now, Norris has launched a Kickstarter campaign called #PROMOTEHOMOSEXUALITY, currently up through May 12, to fund his inaugural runway show planned for June 13 at La Mama Galleria, located in the NoHo area of downtown Manhattan. The goal is $7,500.

None


Appropriately, Norris' motto is "queer entrepreneurship as a means of defense." His shirts incorporate all-caps, cheeky statements artfully displayed in simple text and clean lines. They function as provocative conversation starters, meant to both encourage self-awareness and reinforce the individual and collective power of the wearer.

None


None


As a queer person, I've worn several of Norris' shirts, and they definitely help me feel affirmed in my identity, daring, and virtually unable to be fucked with. A few past and present examples include: "Fuck Me Hard or Love Me Tender, Whatever, Just Do It," a sexuality play on Nike's ubiquitous slogan; "Tough Sissy Girl," which shatters the binary, period; and "What Exactly Is Heterosexuality and What Causes It?" which smartly flips common anti-gay Christian rhetoric on its head.

None


More details about Norris' upcoming show will emerge over the next few months, but he tells PAPER that it will be "a collection of denim, T-shirts and accessories through a queer lens: Queer clothes for queer bodies by a queer designer." Incentives for donating include obtaining your own WILLIENORRISWORKSHOP goods, such as shirts with the words "Promote Homosexuality."

None


Related | Club Kids Crowded Inside a Gay Bar For This Designer's Runway Debut

None


Norris says that to commemorate the month-long campaign, he is working with a group of collaborators to get their artistic interpretation of the "Promote Homosexuality" tee. "I have started lovingly referring to it as 'queer propaganda' looks through their artistic lens," he says. "I am calling this collective project '#30DAYSOFGAY.' As of now, I have over 30 collaborators who are creating content for this campaign."

None


What is more appropriate for a queer designer encouraging resistance than this? Click here to donate (and peruse Norris' list of planned collaborations), and follow him on Instagram (@willienorrisworkshop).


None


Photography: Heather Sten

]]>
Thu, 25 Apr 2019 19:55:21 +0000http://www.nojx.tw/willie-norris-promote-homosexuality-2635532269.htmlWillie norris workshopWillienorrisworkshop#promotehomosexualityWest dakotaLgbtLgbtqQueerDesignFashionLia clayCharlene30 days of gay#30daysofgayWillie norrisMichael Love Michael
The 'Queen of Nails' Reflects on 20 Years of Experiencehttp://www.nojx.tw/nailed-it-marian-newman-2635527476.html

For over two decades, Marian Newman has been hailed as the Queen of Nails, and rightly so. The celebrated nail artist has established herself as the definitive voice in an industry inundated with eager creatives. The rise in wacky nail art only caught traction in the past decade. Newman on the other hand, was challenging an otherwise mundane industry with limited room for the outrageous, in the pre-millennium era.

None


"What I love the most [about nail art] is figuring out how to make something work from a scientific aspect," Newman tells PAPER. "That means I have to understand how products work. This isn't always nail products as I often have to create very unusual effects. Once I had to research how to safely set fire to the nails, and another time was to make fake solid honey."

None


It's also why she drew the attention of the likes of Maison Margiela, Nick Knight, Dior, Givenchy, and Vivienne Westwood, who were instrumental in pushing her deep into fashion, an industry she currently dictates as the most sought after nail artist. From couture shows, to high-end advertising campaigns, Newman has done it all and has some incredible stories to tell. So when approached to put it all down in an inclusive tell-all, she of course said yes.

None


Related | Dissecting 30 Years of Rankin's Photos

None


Nailed It: Nails. Fashion. Technique details not just Newman's larger than life projects (including about 50 covers for British Vogue) but also goes deeper into some of the most outrageous celebrity stories working with the likes of Lady Gaga and Kate Moss.

None


Cited as the "biggest influence in the nail world," through her book that debuted this week, Newman willfully bares some of the best kept secrets and techniques behind her most iconic designs.

None


PAPER caught up with incredible artist to get a first look at her new book, BTS celebrity stories, and what goes behind her intricate work.

None


None


None


None


None


None


None


What inspired you to write this book?

Quite honestly I was invited. But after discussing it I realized I had so many stories to tell. It had also been an interesting 20 year experience that, at times, has been a bit of a battle. So many in the fashion industry don't really see the point of nails. But then so many more did see that it could be so many things: from just good grooming through a big statement. I decided it would be fun to share some of those stories.

None


What are some of the most interesting BTS stories that you talk about in the book?

One of the best things about this job has been the people. I've met so many interesting people and I mean, not just the celebrities, actors, or models but also all the people who come together to create images or films. I think all the stories are interesting but I suppose people are most fascinated by Lady Gaga. "What is she like?" improbably one of the most asked questions I've had. Well, some of my Gaga stories are in the book.

None


Related | 'G.U.Y.' Turns Five: When Gaga Rose From the Ashes

None


What is the most memorable project you've worked on?

I have been lucky enough to work on so many memorable projects, it's hard to pick just one! I would put the Closing Ceremony of the 2012 London Olympics with the super models and performers must be up there on the list. So is the first Fashion Rocks in the Albert Hall. But so many more; too many 'pinch me' moments.

None


How and when did you first get involved in working with nails?


It was by accident and not a plan. It was over 30 years ago when the pro industry was in its infancy and it was the science side of it that hooked me in.


None


What inspires you to constantly innovate within your work? Do you have a creative process?

My inspiration is to find something new. That is almost impossible these days due to social media as someone somewhere will have done something similar. I tend to revolve my creative process around words and never look at nails on social media for inspiration. I look everywhere else but what I love the most is figuring out how to make something work from a scientific aspect. That means I have to understand how products work. This isn't always nail products as I often have to create very unusual effects. Once I had to research how to safely set fire to the nails, and another time was to make fake solid honey.

None


Who do you look up to?

Many people — those that have a genius and a dedication. I've had the pleasure to meet geniuses so many times and just been blown away at just how awesome (and usually humble) they are


None


"Once I had to research how to safely set fire to the nails, and another time was to make fake solid honey."

None


What is your most important piece of advice for an aspiring nail artist?


Keep learning! You will never know everything. Have an open mind and take on board new developments in the industry. Always ask "why?" and make sure you get the answer. Work hard, be nice and keep that dream alive.

None


What are some other projects you're working on currently?

Apart from already planning the next fashion season as Couture is not that many weeks away, a project I am really enjoying is working with Swarovski Professional. We have just launched the Crystal Beauty Academy for the UK and this will get rolled out to many other countries soon. We have an educators team of 15 and they are ready to start offering workshops to nail artists. I am the authorized Instructor for now and have lots of plans to inspire the team and add to their repertoire of skills.

None


Nailed It: Nails. Fashion. Technique is priced at $29.99 and available for purchase here.

None


Photos courtesy of Aleksandra Kingo

]]>
Thu, 25 Apr 2019 19:08:17 +0000http://www.nojx.tw/nailed-it-marian-newman-2635527476.htmlNailed it: nail fashion techniqueBritish vogueMarian newmanAuthorBookNail artLady gagaKate mossDiorGivenchyVivienne westwoodMaison margielaNick knightNailed itJeena Sharma
Rico Nasty and Kenny Beats Ignite on 'Anger Management'http://www.nojx.tw/rico-nasty-kenny-beats-anger-management-2635541547.html

"This shit is in different areas!" a vocal sample from the popular meme begins the second track off of Rico Nasty and Kenny Beats' new project, Anger Management. It's only appropriate for the track, titled "Cheat Code" and featuring "Harlem Shake" producer Baauer. Gusts of EDM-like synths crash into kicks and snares that snip at Nasty's sharp rhymes, while the distorted bass underneath Nasty's vocals is the stuff of dreams. "Cheat Code" is Rico Nasty at her peak, delivering clenching raps that dare to test your earbuds' volume limit.

None


Related | Rico Nasty Smoked a Joint at Gypsy Sport

None


Anger Management was only announced relatively recently, but the buzz spread immediately and fans began gearing up for an inevitable sonic siege. Kenny Beats and Rico Nasty are practically an unstoppable musical duo at this point, with their tagline — a piercing exclamation of "Kenny!" by Nasty herself — becoming a meme in and of itself. The two are only competing with themselves at this point for the top slot in their arena.


None


The project follows up Nasty's previous release, Nasty, and trails on the end of the massive success of her feature on Doja Cat's "Tia Tamera." She just can't stop winning — her Coachella set was talked about massively on social media, and she's about to embark on a tour of several European festivals. Hell, even Lil Miquela wants to rub shoulders with her!

None


Related | Lil Miquela: (Cyber) Girl of the 21st Century

None


If anything, Anger Management demonstrates that Rico Nasty's streak of success shows no signs of dipping anytime soon. Highlights include the popping "Big T*****s (feat. Baauer and EarthGang)" and Jay-Z sampling "Hatin." The slick-but-bright closing track, "Again," is perhaps the most effective; it's reminiscent of her summer 2017 project, Tales of Tacobella, a pivotal moment in her career. The tracks on Tales of Tacobella were bubbly-yet-prickly, officially solidifying her position in rap and her social media presence — her name on Instagram is still "TACOBELLA." On "Again," she's looping back to that 2017 rush of success and attention, marking her entrance into a new era of worldwide acclaim.


None


Photo courtesy of Rico Nasty

]]>
Thu, 25 Apr 2019 17:29:59 +0000http://www.nojx.tw/rico-nasty-kenny-beats-anger-management-2635541547.htmlRico nastyKenny beatsBrendan Wetmore
King Princess to Headline San Diego Pridehttp://www.nojx.tw/san-diego-pride-king-princess-2635471632.html

Pride month is just around the corner and will be here before you know it. This year marks the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall riots, the event that launched the modern LGBTQ+ rights movement and the entire reason we celebrate Pride in June. Across the country, this year's festivities are already shaping up to be by far the biggest we've ever seen, which is why San Diego Pride is pulling out all the stops with their newly announced headliner, King Princess.

None


Related | 50 LGBTQ Musicians You Should Prioritize

None


Fresh off playing Coachella, the queer Brooklyn-based songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, and producer is set top the bill for San Diego's Pride Festival alongside other LGBTQ+ icons such as Melissa Etheridge. King Princess skyrocketed to fame last year with a string of critically acclaimed releases landing her a record deal with Mark Ronson's label and culminating in the sapphic anthem "Pussy Is God."


None


"Playing San Diego Pride is a true honor," she says. "Pride celebrations are a pillar of liberation and representation in our community, and a reminder of our ability to bring happiness to one and another through inclusion. It's about giving each other a home in which we can share our truest expression of self without judgement. Our founding mother Marsha [P. Johnson] fought to give us our space to express ourselves freely and to celebrate our love, I'm honored to be a part of this loving community. Come rock with me and Melissa!"

None


As the sixth largest Pride celebration in the country, the two-day annual festival draws over 45,000 people to its wide selection of vendors, art exhibitions, presentations, food, and stacked lineup of performers. King Princess will only be the latest in a long line of queer icons to grace the San Diego Pride Festival, including previous performers Kesha, TLC, Kathy Griffin, JoJo, Kim Petras, Margaret Cho, En Vogue, Estelle, Ruby Rose and Big Freedia.

None


"Pride celebrations are a pillar of liberation and representation in our community, and a reminder of our ability to bring happiness to one and another through inclusion."

None


"The ability for compelling LGBTQ artists like King Princess to come right out the gate fully embracing their identity in their music, medium, and public persona embodies how far we've come since the Stonewall Riots," says San Diego Pride Executive Director Fernando López. "It's an honor to have a queer rising star like King Princess headline at San Diego Pride's Festival along with Melissa Etheridge and all the other iconic LGBTQ artists we're eager to announce, all of whom approach their craft and our community with social justice in their hearts."

None


Tickets to San Diego Pride Festival are currently available online in addition to a limited number of meet-and-greet tickets for King Princess.


None


Photo courtesy of King Princess

]]>
Thu, 25 Apr 2019 17:15:02 +0000http://www.nojx.tw/san-diego-pride-king-princess-2635471632.htmlSan diegoPrideSan diego prideMelissa etheridgeLgbtqStonewallMarsha p johnsonPussy is god1950King princessMatt Moen
How Country Continues to Erase Lil Nas Xhttp://www.nojx.tw/billy-ray-cyrus-lil-nas-x-erasure-2635525228.html

By now, you've likely heard about the well-publicized controversy involving Lil Nas X's viral hit "Old Town Road" getting booted from the Billboard Country charts. However, it appears that someone in Nashville — the hub for the country music industry — didn't get the memo.

None


In a now viral tweet by user @CakeMaster3000, a photo of a sign congratulating Billy Ray Cyrus on his number one hit, "Old Town Road (Remix)" can be seen alongside his tweet, which reads, "Damn. They took @LilNasX off the country charts but gave Billy Ray the congrats sign over here on Music Row in Nashville, TN." And even though some fans pointed out that Cyrus previously posted a photo with his own sign that read "I would not have this sign without Lil Nas X and [song producer] Kio," that apparently wasn't enough to keep the rest of the internet from picking up on the story.



None


But that's unsurprising, especially as @CakeMaster3000's tweet paints a damning picture. Not only is it a reminder of Lil Nas X's unceremonious dethroning from the Billboard Country charts but, at first glance, it also appears to be a erasure-filled celebration of the viral hit. Because while industry insiders explained that the celebratory sign was likely bought by Cyrus' publisher or label — a regular occurrence for hits in Nashville — the blatant shift in tone is jarring, especially as Cyrus' "achievement" is being so visibly and publicly lauded in the same exact space that outwardly rejected Lil Nas X's original a mere week earlier. Not only are the parallels to Black erasure within the Yee Haw resurgence strong, but it also raises the question of how the industry approaches contemporary crossover culture, as well as the discrepancies between the ways different types of crossover hits are treated.

None


After all, as a cursory examination of the current Billboard Hot 100 will reveal, our pop music now trends toward the genre-spanning with some of our most popular artists openly eschewing particular labels. Not only that, but as many have observed, a lot of popular music right now skews toward traditionally Black genres such as rap, R&B, and hip-hop. As such, there's plenty of crossover between the Hot 100 and Hip-Hop/R&B chart — the latter of which has embraced a healthy mix of everyone from straight-up rappers like 21 Savage to the contentious emo-rap of Juice WRLD and the blurry rap-rock of Post Malone.

None


Well, then why can't you also consider "Old Town Road" a country song? And why — unlike the Hip-Hop/R&B charts — has country only allowed a very certain kind of crossover pop hit to chart? And why has country, compared to the other charts, been so slow to embrace alternative cultural exchange, especially if pop as a whole is rapidly diversifying in terms of sonic motifs and influences?

None


Related | How Yeehaw Took Over the Internet

None


Which poses the question: Was the rejection due to nit-picking sonic purists? Or was it, as many online asked, an underlying matter of racial gatekeeping? Perhaps country trap — an admittedly uncommon crossover — is simply too different for the current market. But then again, why was it even placed in the Pop, Hip-Hop/R&B, and Country categories to begin with?

None


Well, according to Billboard it was a "mistake." In a statement to Rolling Stone, the organization explained that musical composition is the "first and foremost" factor in terms of genre determination and "while 'Old Town Road' incorporates references to country and cowboy imagery, it does not embrace enough elements of today's country music to chart in its current version." Adding to this is the publication's report on the controversy, which points toward country insiders themselves being hesitant to change. After all, while "Old Town Road" was initially presented as a country song, after "the distributor did a quick temperature-check in Nashville," it turned out that "everyone kind of looked at it as a gimmick." Curiously enough though, while "Old Town Road" received with the same side-eye as another viral sensation, Mason Ramsey, the latter was able to stay on the country charts.

None


Related | Mason Ramsey Keeps Getting Bigger and Bigger

None


To that end, where does it start and where does it stop? And who gets to be the end all, be all arbiter of what "embraces enough elements of today's country music" in order to qualify it for the Billboard charts? Is there even any real transparency when it comes to the ways these lists, and who's included on them, are determined? After all, how much credence can we give an institution that still utilizes categories like "Latin" and "R&B" to denote, frankly, racially-defined subsets of music?

None


Obviously, this entire situation raises more questions than answers. So perhaps, the answer is to be more proactive and take this opportunity to re-evaluate our metrics as a whole. How do we come up with a more up-front way of figuring out how to categorize music in a world where "genre-less" is becoming the descriptor-du-jour? Or, at least, figure out how the industry will respond to incidents like this in the future so that we don't have to keep counting on Billy Ray.

None


Welcome to "Internet Explorer," a column by Sandra Song about everything Internet. From meme histories to joke format explainers to collections of some of Twitter's finest roasts, "Internet Explorer" is here to keep you up-to-date with the web's current obsessions — no matter how nonsensical or nihilistic.

None


Photo via Twitter

]]>
Thu, 25 Apr 2019 16:34:10 +0000http://www.nojx.tw/billy-ray-cyrus-lil-nas-x-erasure-2635525228.htmlBilly ray cyrusLil nas xYeehawCountryMusicHip-hopOld town roadSandra Song
Blake Lively Used to Pretend Her Forever 21 Looks Were 'Vintage'http://www.nojx.tw/blake-lively-forever-21-2635531399.html

There was a brief period in the mid 2000s where it was considered totally appropriate for celebrities to wear club looks on the red carpet. Back then, a designer dress looked much the same as an off-the-rack mall find, because literally all clothing was objectively hideous. People thought it was fine and normal to wear jeans underneath a dress, for example. Skirts were short, colors were neon, belts were chunky, jewelry was boho. Everyone looked awful, but the upside was that you could get away with a lot.

None


Blake Lively has revealed as much, in conversation with actress Sydney Sweeney for InStyle. The Gossip Girl alum explained that she used to rock Forever 21 dresses on red carpets, passing them off to curious fashion reporters as funky vintage finds.

None


Related | A 'Gossip Girl' Reboot is 'In Discussion'

None


"I wore Forever 21 much longer than I admitted," Lively said. "I just started saying it was vintage because I was so shamed for it. [laughs] For me, fashion is a form of self-expression. It also really takes me out of my comfort zone. One of the reasons I'm an actor is that I'm naturally very shy, so it's liberating to dress up and pretend to be someone else."

None


Lively, who doesn't typically work with a stylist, previously admitted in a Glamour UK interview that she once wore a Forever 21 dress that cost just $13 to a premiere: "On the red carpet people were like 'who are you wearing?' But when I told them, they said I shouldn't admit to it, like it was more impressive to have a designer gown that's thousands of dollars. After that I just told people it was vintage."

None


We love this, we see this, and we respect this. Sometimes fast fashion is the only option! Even when you're starring as a rich and stylish teen on Gossip Girl.

None


Rewind to some classique aughts Lively looks, below.

None


None


None


None


None


None


None


None


None


Photos via Getty

]]>
Thu, 25 Apr 2019 16:03:56 +0000http://www.nojx.tw/blake-lively-forever-21-2635531399.htmlBlake livelyForever 21Katherine Gillespie
The Center Honors Lena Waithe, Raises $2.2 Millionhttp://www.nojx.tw/the-center-lena-waithe-2635428735.html

At last week's annual The Center Dinner, over 1,000 notable entertainment industry luminaries and LGBTQ supporters gathered in New York to honor those who have made huge strides for the community in recent years. Together, they all helped raise more than $2.2 million dollars in support of The Center's ongoing community initiatives and innovative programming. It was reportedly the largest fundraiser in recent memory for The Center, since its 1983 founding.

None


Chief among those present was The Center board co-chair and designer Alexis Bittar, model and activist Geena Rocero comedian Kid Fury, New York Congressman Jerry Nadler, Selah Marley, and more. There were also a number of important honors handed out last Thursday: filmmaker Lena Waithe, was honored with the 2019 Trailblazers Award; CNN anchor Don Lemon with the Community Impact Award; Goldman Sachs senior chairman Lloyd Blankfein with the Ally Award; and Google, whose community-focused inclusivity initiatives won the year's Corporate Impact Award.

None


A silent art auction was also held during the evening, in conjunction with Paddle8. Artists such as Donald Baechler, Anthony Goicolea, Deborah Kass, Marilyn Minter, Laurie Simmons and Rob Wynne, and more, all donated pieces to the auction.


None


The night's honorees spoke before the seated crowd at Cipriani Wall Street. Later in the dinner program, The Center's executive director Glennda Testone addressed the importance of the iconic community organization's existence as a beacon of support. Since 1983, The Center has become a primary hub for LGBTQ people and allies, adding a range of health-centric free programming and services over the years, offering everything from 12-step fellowships and mental health and counseling to specialized youth and activism groups.

None


"Over the years, some of our needs have stayed the same, and some have changed," Testone told the crowd. "But one thing that will never change is that LGBTQ people will always have a place to go when they need support, community and connection. People can always come to The Center."

None


Upon receiving the Ally Award, Blankfein — who has been publicly outspoken in advocating for marriage equality, LGBTQ representation in the workplace, and more inclusive policies to prevent discrimination — noted that as the head of Goldman Sachs, he was in a unique position to promote change. Blankfein told stories about how queer colleagues came out to him, saying that it got him to think about how, though even he felt pressure to perform well at work, such pressures would come twice as hard for those in the closet.

None


"It was my responsibility to be a real champion of the people that work for us," Blankfein said. "Not only did I feel it was OK to speak out on behalf of their well-being, I felt an obligation to do so. It was my duty to use my voice and platform to make sure everyone was able to bring their whole selves to work - to realize their full potential without distraction whether they be lesbian, gay, bi, trans, HIV positive, a person of color, an immigrant... I owed it to the people I recruited to join my company."

None


None


None


None


None


None


None


At the end of the night, Lena Waithe was presented with the Trailblazer Award. During her speech, she addressed previous award winners, as well as young Freddy Perez, a queer Latinx man who shared his experience recovering from drug addiction, and how The Center's various recovery services helped him get back on track. Perez told the crowd that because of the Center's impact, he was closer to his goal of being a substance abuse coach for others struggling with drug use. Waithe noted that "we are all icons," and that in order for her to continue to be a leading voice for LGBTQ representation, "I need your stories, I need your slayage."

None


She continued: "Everyone that calls The Center home, as you see me standing here before you, I see each and every one of you. I see your struggle, I see your pain, I see your trials bit I also see the light and beauty that is you. I see that being yourself is an option. It is OK for you to be you no matter who thinks otherwise."

None


Photos via BFA

]]>
Thu, 25 Apr 2019 15:49:05 +0000http://www.nojx.tw/the-center-lena-waithe-2635428735.htmlLgbt centerLena waitheNew york cityLgbtLgbtqGlennda testoneAlexis bittarKid furyGeena roceroGoogleLaurie simmonsMarilyn minterSelah marleyLloyd blankfeinThe centerMichael Love Michael
Ishan Made a Better 'Closer by The Chainsmokers'http://www.nojx.tw/ishan-closer-by-the-chainsmokers-2635375533.html

Rising New York musician, Ishan, is stepping out and doing so with flair.

None


Having recently collaborated with ethereal pop artist, Juletta, on her debut Wild Nature EP, the young Indian-American producer is looking to make his mark with a forthcoming debut EP of his own, Sonia, and, to be fair, with a track title like "Closer by The Chainsmokers" we were bound to take notice. A song named specifically to disrupt a certain EDM duo's SEO, "Closer by the Chainsmokers" is just as playful as you would imagine.

None


Related | 8 Breakout Stars Headlining India's Entertainment Revolution

None


Combining elements of electroswing with samples from old Bollywood films, the song's seamless integration of Indian culture with American pop functions as the young artist's mission statement. "I grew up listening to songs like that sample in my household constantly," Ishan explains, "and while I've never understood the language, Bollywood music has always resonated with me at an instinctual level."

None


The video for "Closer by The Chainsmokers" is a similarly lighthearted take on pre-existing pop tropes, following Ishan as he smoothly dances through the otherworldly landscape of nighttime New York. Ishan wear's his influences on his sleeve, channeling Michael Jackson and Kanye West with a dash of the enigmatic Jai Paul thrown in for good measure. "Closer by The Chainsmokers" is fun, flirty, and thankfully won't remind you of being pulled closer in the backseat of a Rover that you know you can't afford.

None


Watch the PAPER premiere of the official video for Ishan's "Closer by The Chainsmokers," below, and follow him on Instagram (@ishan.jpg_).


None


Photo courtesy of Ishan

]]>
Thu, 25 Apr 2019 15:26:32 +0000http://www.nojx.tw/ishan-closer-by-the-chainsmokers-2635375533.htmlCloser by the chainsmokerJulettaMusicElectronicElectroswingPopThe chainsmokersIndian-americanSoniaIshanMatt Moen
Pete Davidson and Kate Beckinsale Are Overhttp://www.nojx.tw/pete-davidson-kate-beckinsale-rip-2635529066.html

Another tabloid-worthy Pete Davidson romance reportedly bites the dust: the SNL comic has called it quits with Kate Beckinsale. Happily, the rebound relationship that truly no one saw coming likely ended on amicable terms.

None


Entertainment Tonight and People are reporting that the two have either "slowed things down" or completely called it quits, although they're "still friendly." Could conflicting schedules be an issue? Davidson is currently living in his mom's basement, starring in SNL, and touring with John Mulaney. Beckinsale is starring British TV series The Widow.

None


Related | Pete Davidson Picks Up Kanye's Nobu Tab

None


Davidson and Beckinsale first got together at a Golden Globes after party, not long after the comedian's engagement to Ariana Grande ended with a bang. They've been frequently sighted in public — never forget those courtside make out sessions feat. Antoni. Davidson also spoke about the relationship on SNL's Weekend Update segment, wondering out loud why tabloids were so obsessed with his and Beckinsale's age gap. Even Ariana gave the relationship her blessing.


None


RIP, Deckinsale! We'll always have the memories, and trust that Davidson's famously Big Dick Energy will serve him well in bachelorhood.

None


Photo via Getty

]]>
Thu, 25 Apr 2019 15:06:10 +0000http://www.nojx.tw/pete-davidson-kate-beckinsale-rip-2635529066.htmlPete davidsonKate beckinsaleKatherine Gillespie
Kim Petras Shows a Side You've Never Seenhttp://www.nojx.tw/kim-petras-broken-interview-2635525528.html

Some fans of Kim Petras' singles — from "I Don't Want It At All" and "Hillside Boys," to the more recent "1, 2, 3 Dayz Up" — might find themselves scratching their heads at the beginning of the pop star's newest song, "Broken." The boldfaced chorus begins the song, but is undercut at first by a more subtle instrumental track than fans might be used to. A steady stream of drum hits are muffled in tandem with loving synths that glide under Petras' glossy vocals.

None


By the time the second wave of the chorus hits, fans will find themselves bobbing their heads. The breakup anthem is better felt in the sway of one's shoulders rather than in the spring of one's jump — which would be a normal reaction for other songs in her discography. Jumping up and down to a KP bop like "Heart to Break" in a gay bar on a Friday night is practically a rite of passage in 2019. "Broken," however, is perhaps Petras' most low-key banger yet, more in line with the direction of modern Top 40 radio pop.

None


Related | Paris Hilton Interviews Kim Petras

None


While "Broken" doesn't possess the exact same treble-heavy energy listeners have gotten used to, there exists a similar sense of pop-thenticity that she's cultivated as uniquely her own over the past year. Her emphasis on inflection that boosts buzzy phrasing, like "I'm in Paris in Marc Jacobs," does not go unnoticed. Despite singing about being broken hearted, she's managed to propel the song forward with cleverly crafted lines about her own public persona.

None


These playful moments, juxtaposed with the song's sincere theming, are what ultimately prop up "Broken" as the perfect single to lead her new album rollout. PAPER caught up with Petras to talk about the song, getting back into the studio after the Bloom Tour, and keeping fans on their toes.


None


How are you gearing up for the release?

I'm super anxious, I always am. I just get freaked out because I never know what people are going to say, so I'm trying to not think about that. I'm going to the studio today, just finishing more stuff up. It's kind of a normal day, but also the song's coming out. I'm not doing anything fancy, at all.

None


If I were you I'd celebrate because you have nothing to be worried about. "Broken" is so good, I'm loving it.

Thank you!

None


It feels like the perfect single to be the first one from the album. What led you to choose "Broken"?

The song just kind of appeared very much in the beginning of the whole process. I had just come off of Troye Sivan's Bloom Tour, which was really amazing but also really exhausting. It was a lot of dates and a lot of back-to-back shows. Being away from the studio, I just had a book full of things that I wanted to write about that I had collected over the run of the Bloom Tour, and this was kind of one of the first ones that immediately came out with this guy, Theron Thomas. He's really amazing, he's from Rock City and I've been a fan of his for a long time. He wrote, "Shawty's like a melody in my head..."

None


Oh my god.

That song!

None


"I completely put this part of me away that feels pain and put on a smile every day."

None


The best song of 2009.

Totally! So I've been a stan. We were just talking. This word, "Broken," in general, kept coming up in everything I was doing. It just happened super quick and kind of crystalized itself out to be the whole entire vision for the album, just because I have been going through some personal shit and a pretty bad breakup at the same time as doing the tour. Being on stage every night, singing all these super hyper songs...

None


Jumping around and having to be happy all the time.

Totally, hyping people up. I was just kind of like, "Fuck. I completely put this part of me away that feels pain and put on a smile every day." It kind of came down into a bunch of songs that are pretty emo. I had always felt pretty not very great about being like, "Oh, I'm so sad," because I'm very blessed and a person who's like, "Pick yourself back up and just go." This time around, I was just kind of like, "Yep. I'm going to talk about how I feel, and whine." Which is very un-German, just not talking about that. I was like, "It's okay to feel things and be a little emo." That was my breakup!

None


Related | Boo Ah! Kim Petras Gets Spooky With Halloween Icon Elvira

None


The imagery around "Broken," that you've been posting to social media has had that dark aesthetic. It's not the same as your Halloween release, it's dark in a different way and in a way that's much more universal in terms of sadness. What that was like, expressing that sadness?

I was just kind of like, "Let's strip this back and make it more about me." I was honestly like, "Let's make it more about me than the outfits or anything." I'm wearing a 10-dollar-vintage-store- white old negligee. It's kind of like a fallen angel-type aesthetic, which I'm super into, obviously. We picked this amazing house that had been abandoned for a long time in LA with this empty pool, with super lavish decorations and ornaments, amazing chandeliers, shit like that. It was something that used to be so extra and so amazing, and people obviously had a lot of fun there, and then it's just abandoned. It's like being broken up with, I guess.

None


Yeah, the ruins.

Yeah, kind of. I'm always really into a glam vibe, but in something wrecked. I love wrecked things. I feel like I've done that before in "Faded," where it was this old warehouse on Hollywood Boulevard which was super out of place. Abandoned is always my vibe. [Laughs]


None


That makes sense, though, with the song. It's not a "Hillside Boys," or an "All the Time" where you feel it in your legs and you want to jump around. When you were creating it, did you find you were dancing to it, even though it's about being broken?

Of course. 1000%. Over the space of the last half-year, most of what I've been listening to and what I've been obsessed with is Kanye West's 808s & Heartbreak, and old Rihanna records, Post Malone and Travis Scott. That's what I've been really into and what I feel like got me over a bunch of heartbreak. Before that, my whole focus was like, "OK, I just want to make classic gay club: old school Madonna, classics! That was more my thing, which makes sense now, because if I got one record I could do any music that I like. I kind of like every genre, I like the great music of every genre. If I had to pick my all-time favorite, it would just be '80s, super colorful, super happy shit that's reminiscent of early Madonna, who is my absolute idol in life.

None


Like "Holiday!"

Yeah! "Into the Groove," and "Holiday!" All of those classics, like "Papa Don't Preach." Those super sparkly pop records! I feel like it was just natural, I just really got into this type of music and listened to that type of artist and that was immediately reflected in what I gravitated towards. I started this era outgoing, going to different producers and listening to different tracks, and every track that I gravitated to was more trap-y. I was just like, "This is what I immediately have an idea for." I just always go off of what feels authentic to me, what I'm feeling right now, and the type of music that I'm listening to right now.

None


"Broken" is undeniably authentic. The lyrics like, "You cut me open/ I cried oceans/ All I wanted was devotion," and "I'm in Paris in Marc Jacobs," that's so you! It's your story and the song has a trap-inspired edge.

Even when I'm sad, I always try to make it fun. At the same time, I feel like Juice WRLD has been super fun for me to listen to, even though it's the most sad shit ever that he's saying. It's those concepts that everybody just wants to scream out, so that's kind of what I wanted to do. I'm kind of braggy in it, I'm just like, "When she leaves you for your best friend, that shit karma/ When you see me with my new dude, that's a come-up." At the same time, I'm stunting, because that's who I am.

None


Related | 40 Trans and GNC People Sound Off on Trump's Memo

None


Kim Petras has bars!

It's so exciting to me, for the first time I have a fucking flow. I have a flow and I have some bars. Even before I did "I Don't Want It At All" and stuff like that, I did wackier stuff and that's what I listened to. Then I just kind of got into this obsession — which I still fucking love so much, I'll never get tired of it. It's kind of a return for me, too, because that's kind of what I was doing as a songwriter. I was just in sessions every single day trying to write for Rihanna and working with everyone and their mom in LA. I've done that part too, so it's kind of circled back.

None


Now that it's going to be the first single to represent the album, do you feel relief or more anxiety about putting it out? I hear a mix from artists sometimes when talking about their first single.

Yeah, I think there's so much pressure on the first single for that initial reaction. I have other shit coming super soon, so I'm not really worried about how people... I really want my fans to like it, that's all I really care about. Then the next ones drop, which I'm so excited for, I definitely just want to keep releasing a lot of stuff. This is definitely the best starting point that I had. This sums it up, but there's a lot of different things. I'm always going to want to surprise people, that's my number one thing. I think I also wanted to release this one because I think it's going to be surprising to a lot of people. To a lot of people, I'm a super upbeat, almost animated Lizzie McGuire pop star, which I love being, but this is a different side of me and I don't think I've shown it before. I'm excited.

None


When "Can't Do Better" came out, everyone wasn't expecting this huge power ballad. It was a totally different side from the singles that had been released, so I think you do a good job of keeping the fans on their toes. Just when they think they know...

Especially since the last thing was the Halloween mixtape. I really just always want to switch it up. At the end of the day, what I love is music and making music, but genres — I think they're disappearing. I think everybody should just take whatever they like from any genre and fucking make the most creative thing they can come up with. That's been my little philosophy this time around.

None


"I feel like I'm more confident in being me now."

None


I can't exactly pinpoint what I feel is different about "Broken" from your previous singles, maybe it's the fact that it's going to represent something else, a whole body of work. Was it different making this song than the other singles?

I think every single song I ever do is different. It comes from different places. Sometimes I'll watch a movie and I'm like, "Wow. This is the perfect song title," and here we go. Sometimes I'm just in the studio banging my head against the wall for days and days and days and not coming up with anything good. This one was a very lucky one, I felt like I had just come off of tour and I was hungry to get back in the studio. It just kind of fell into my lap, it was pretty easy. I think the thing that has changed is me, and the shit that I've done this past year which has been super transformative for me as a person. I feel like I'm more confident in being me now. I think that's a big part that I owe to my fans because when I first came out with "I Don't Want It At All," I was just like, "Yo. Is anybody going to like this?" I'm not the most confident person, I'm kind of a quiet person in a room. I'm literally just in the room, writing lyrics onto a notepad and not talking to anybody. I was really insecure in the beginning of this, and I feel like now that I know there's people who actually like me, and they want to hear what I have to say. They've given me an enormous boost of confidence, and now I'm just much more comfortable being myself. I'm excited about this round, because I feel like there's so much more personality now as like who I've now become over the last year.

None


I'm so excited to see what this brings. Did you have anything else you wanted to add about the single.

Sure! I fucking love this one, I hope people really like it. I'm super excited to see how everybody reacts, I'm super anxious, but I guess I'll see! And more music is always coming. I'm always working on music.

None


Always feeding the fans.

Always feeding the gays!


None


Photography: Thom Kerr

]]>
Thu, 25 Apr 2019 14:16:57 +0000http://www.nojx.tw/kim-petras-broken-interview-2635525528.htmlKim petrasTroye sivanBrendan Wetmore
Ariana Grande Defends Justin Bieber Over Coachella Lip Sync Allegationshttp://www.nojx.tw/ariana-grande-bloggers-criticism-2635475587.html

In case you missed the livestream, Ariana Grande closed out her headlining set at Coachella this past weekend by bringing out her bud, Justin Bieber, to perform a rendition of "Sorry." And while stans loved it, to many others, it appeared as if Bieber was lip syncing during the performance — something that was touched on by E! News host, Morgan Stewart.

None


In a Coachella recap segment, Stewart responds to the clip by saying, "I did not realize it was going to be that bad!" before adding, "He definitely looks like he put an Oxy pad on that forehead, but I don't care. That is fucked up!" That said, Bieber did not take kindly to her comment.

None


None


On Wednesday, the singer tweeted to Stewart, writing, "imagine if you spent even half the time you spend laughing at other peoples expense actually building people up and encouraging people." Bieber then went on to chide Stewart for not using her platform for good and positivity.

None


None


None


As a result, Grande came to his defense via a few, now-deleted tweets, including one that said, "People are so lost. One day everybody that works at all them blogs will realize how unfulfilled they are and purposeless what they're doing is and hopefully shift their focus elsewhere. That's gonna be a beautiful ass day for them! I can't wait for them to feel lit inside."

None


However, shortly after deleting the initial series of tweets, Grande reportedly replied to a comment explaining, "There's a big difference between journalism and what was happening in that video."

None


"I was hurt for my friend," she wrote. "My apologies to anybody offended by my lumping them together." It appears that Grande has since deleted that tweet as well.

None


Photo via Getty

]]>
Thu, 25 Apr 2019 00:19:02 +0000http://www.nojx.tw/ariana-grande-bloggers-criticism-2635475587.htmlAriana grandeJustin bieberCoachella 2019Morgan stewartE!BloggersJournalismSandra Song
'Game of Thrones' Star Daniel Portman Has Been Sexually Assaulted by Fanshttp://www.nojx.tw/got-daniel-portman-assault-1-2635471669.html

Any regular viewer of Game of Thrones is familiar with Podrick Payne's sexual prowess. Unfortunately though, the actor who plays him has apparently had some very serious, very unpleasant real-life run-ins with fans who are having trouble separating him from his character.

None


Speaking with Esquire, actor Daniel Portman shared that while he feels lucky to play Sex God Pod, he's not really sure where his fictional alter-ego gets his skills from. "If I fucking knew my life would be very different. I was 20 when that happened, so it was kind of like a kid in a candy shop," he told the publication. "When you tell a 20-year-old actor, who's sort of stumbled onto this big TV show, that all of a sudden you're meant to be Casanova, people all over the world wonder whether or not it's true. I would be lying if I said that that hadn't been fun."

None


Related | Sexual Assault Survivor's Bill of Rights Creator Nominated for Nobel Peace Prize

None


However, his character's reputation has, sadly, led to Portman being groped numerous times.

None


"I've been grabbed by so many… like the amount of like older, older women who are very..." he said alongside a grabbing gesture, before adding that he has to tell people not to do that.

None


None


"It hasn't happened for a while. In this day and age you'd think that people would be able to separate reality from fiction," Portman shared. "I don't want to say it comes with the territory, but, you know, people are crazy about it. It's certainly not cool." Needless to say, Portman isn't Podrick — and even if he was, touching another person without their permission is several levels of deeply messed up. Yikes all around.

None


Read what else Portman has to say about playing Podrick here.

None


Photo courtesy of HBO

]]>
Wed, 24 Apr 2019 23:17:46 +0000http://www.nojx.tw/got-daniel-portman-assault-1-2635471669.htmlSandra Song
Madonna and Maluma Debut Their 'Medellín' Music Videohttp://www.nojx.tw/madonna-maluma-medellin-2635469865.html

Madonna and Colombian heartthrob Maluma have finally released the music video for their collaboration, "Medellín," and basically just gave us the blueprint for the shotgun celebrity marriage of the millennium.

None


Directed by Diana Kunst and Mau Morgó, the breezy, reggaeton-influenced ear-worm is straight from Madonna's forthcoming (fourteenth!) studio album, Madame X and it's accompanied by a set of visuals fitting for the superstar's latest, larger-than-life alter ego.

None


Related | How Yee Haw Took Over the Internet

None


Opening with "Madame X" herself kneeling in front of an altar, we're eventually transported to a cha-cha class, a steamy boudoir scene, and a decadent wedding celebration featuring Madonna in a strangely stylish bedazzled eyepatch and cowboy hat wedding veil. Yee haw?

None


Watch the fucked up fairy tale for yourself, below.

None


None


Madame X is set for release June 14.

None


Photo courtesy of Interscope

]]>
Wed, 24 Apr 2019 22:24:33 +0000http://www.nojx.tw/madonna-maluma-medellin-2635469865.htmlMadonnaMalumaMedellinMadame xSandra Song
Elizabeth Olsen's Skincare Secret Is a Placenta Serumhttp://www.nojx.tw/elizabeth-olsen-placenta-serum-skincare-2635465318.html

People can go a little overboard with their skincare routines, especially celebrities, who (understandably so) are under constant scrutiny and pressure to look good. Naturally, many resort to means like invasive procedures, fillers, and botox.

None


Avengers: End Game star Elizabeth Olsen, however, keeps it minimal (?) with one standout product: a placenta serum. In a recent interview with The New York Times, the actress talked about dealing with a random breakout, adding that Biologique Recherche's Serum Placenta has been instrumental in dealing with acne.

None


"Lately I've been having some weird chin issue. I'm not sure if it's a rash or a breakout or something else. It's been around for two months, so this morning I did something different," she says. "I used the micellar water from Biologique Recherche, and then the P50 exfoliant. Then I went to my refrigerator, where I have the placenta serum from the line, and put that on, thinking it would heal my chin. It's one of those water-based serums, and it absorbs immediately. It sounds crazy, but Biologique Recherche works."

None



This bizarre skincare recommendation came to her while working on the TV show Sorry for Your Loss, where she didn't want her character to wear makeup. "A friend told me about Yonat Zilberg, a facialist in the Valley, and she uses Biologique Recherche,"Olsen adds. "She completely changed my skin. I find it hilarious now when a friend will ask in a whisper voice, 'Did you try a little Botox?' No, I have a very expressive face. But I use P50!"

None



Like everyone, Olsen too has her own skincare concerns that she has her own way of addressing. "I have dry spots. My nose is dry, and my chin, with the weird skin thing going on, is drier than usual," she explains. "So it's about layering serums and moisturizers. I've been putting on Augustinus Bader cream before we do makeup."

None


The interview also goes into her favorite sunscreen (Supergoop Unseen Sunscreen) and makeup like the Bobbi Brown Face Base and Long Wear Cream Shadow Stick. Speaking of Supergoop, she explained she isn't necessarily impressed by the packaging. "I really hate the way the bottle looks. It's not sexy. I want my products to look sexy in my bathroom. Supergoop clearly doesn't, but it leaves such a nice finish on my skin," she said.

None


Photo via John Salangsang/BFA

]]>
Wed, 24 Apr 2019 21:57:00 +0000http://www.nojx.tw/elizabeth-olsen-placenta-serum-skincare-2635465318.htmlElizabeth olsenBiologique rechercheSerum placentaBobbi brownLong wear cream shadow stickBobbi brown brown face base primerSupergoop unseen sunscreenSkincareBeautyNew york timesAvengers end gameJeena Sharma
Watch and Listen: FKA Twigs' Devastating, Surreal 'Cellophane'http://www.nojx.tw/fka-twigs-cellophane-video-2635462496.html

FKA Twigs will soon release her first album in five years, the follow-up to 2014's LP1. The first single "Cellophane" and an accompanying video, directed by frequent Bj?rk collaborator, Andrew Thomas Huang are out today.

None


"Cellphane" follows naturally from the promises of LP, but reveals a vision of a totally new scale. The song, a masterpiece on its own right, is a devastating piano ballad about devotion that crumples in on itself, the soft yet bludgeoning vocals of which are pleasantly reminiscent of Sharon Van Etten or Angel Olsen.

None


The film is a four-minute surreal masterpiece that packs the impact of feature length drama. It begins as a gravity-defying, poetic pole dancing performance, turns into a gravity-defying, surreal sci-fi fantasy, and ends with Twigs lying in her 10-inch pleasers in a pool of mud, which two masked figures cover her body in. My best summary A Wrinkle In Time spliced with Suspiria and a one-woman East Village performance art piece.

None


Related | FKA Twigs Sparked a Debate over the Politics of 'Skinny Legends'

None


It's a gorgeous piece of cinema, as well as physical poetry. FKA Twigs took up pole dancing after having six fibroid tumors surgically removed from her uterus, an experience she described as "A fruit bowl of pain everyday." While it's certainly not explicit in "Cellophane," it's not to see its moments of transcendent grace and agony as a visualization of her experience.

None


"When I wrote 'Cellophane' over a year ago a visual narrative came to me immediately," FKA said in a statement. "I knew I had to learn how to pole-dance to bring it to life, and so that's what I did."

None


It's better viewed and listened to, than described.


None


A release date for Twigs' new album hasn't been revealed, but she's announced a set of tour dates starting in May, and will perform at NYC's Afropunk and the Red Bull Music Festival.

None


Photo via YouTube

]]>
Wed, 24 Apr 2019 21:27:52 +0000http://www.nojx.tw/fka-twigs-cellophane-video-2635462496.htmlCellophaneAndrew thomas huangFka twigsJael Goldfine
Lizzo Joins Iconic, Generation-Defining ‘Hustlers’ Casthttp://www.nojx.tw/lizzo-hustlers-cast-cardi-b-2635461303.html

I... love cinema. Bop queen Lizzo has officially been cast in Hustlers, the movie adapted from a viral New York Magazine article published in 2016 that chronicles a group of strippers who turn the tables on their wealthy Wall Street clients. You really can't go wrong with that kind of source material.

None



Lizzo is joining what will surely go down in history as one of the greatest and most random actress ensembles ever: Cardi B, Constance Wu, Jennifer Lopez, Keke Palmer, Julia Stiles, and Lili Reinhart. It's fun to imagine the group chat potential. Lorene Scafaria (Nick & Norah's Infinite Playlist, Seeking a Friend for the End of the World) is writing and directing the film, which is already in production and slated for a September release.

None


Related | 15 Movies We’re Excited to See at Tribeca

None


This will be Lizzo’s first live action movie, but you can hear her voice in the upcoming animated musical Uglydolls. If you didn’t catch her at Coachella, she’s touring North America off the back of her new album Cuz I Love You. Literally cannot wait to see her walk and the rest of the Hustlers gals walk the Oscars red carpet next year.

None


Photo via Getty

]]>
Wed, 24 Apr 2019 20:51:34 +0000http://www.nojx.tw/lizzo-hustlers-cast-cardi-b-2635461303.htmlHustlersMoviesCinemaNew york magazineBopsCuz i love youCardi bConstance wuJennifer lopezJloJulia stilesLili reinhartLorene scafariaLizzoKatherine Gillespie
Please Enjoy Martha Stewart's Amateur Concert Photography of Taylor Swifthttp://www.nojx.tw/martha-stewart-taylor-swift-2635455495.html

Patron of the arts and music critic Martha Stewart attended the Time 100 Gala last night in New York City and really enjoyed honoree and cover star Taylor Swift's acoustic set.

None


We know, because Martha took to Instagram to share her delight. Two days before her mysterious April 26th announcement, Taylor played a selection spanning her entire catalogue, including, via Variety,"New Year's Day," "Delicate," "Shake It Off" and "Love Story."

None


Related | Taylor Swift Stans Give Us Their Predictions for 4.2

None


Everyone took a walk down their a Taylor-Swift-timestamped memory lanes together (where were you when you heard "Love Story" or "Black Space" for the first time?). Martha was there to see it all up close. Extremely up close. So, so, so, so up close.

None


Martha's review of the performance was brief and affecting: "She was eloquent and charming and sang her songs as only she does photos." Her well-meaning zoomed-in iPhone photos of Taylor, however, are a tragic crime of Jim-worthy proportions.


None


Of course, Martha's snaps no different then the terrible photos that you and I take when we have nosebleeds at a show, to prove we were there, and will absolutely never view again. But we aren't all Martha Stewart, are we.

None


Her photo series hits every bucket of photog gaffes: Taylor looks like she's either about to blow the mic, howling in pain, or hiding terrified behind the piano. If her review wasn't so glowing... we'd think this was some serious passive aggression. Perhaps Martha should consider enrolling in Annie Leibovitz' online Masterclass course, to avoid future confusion.

None


Most likely, Taylor's team has already called up Martha and is busy at work having them replaced with some nice Getty images. A shame, it really was a great show. Here's a piece her performance and speech, in which Nora Ephron gets a shout-out.



None


Photo via Getty

]]>
Wed, 24 Apr 2019 20:17:39 +0000http://www.nojx.tw/martha-stewart-taylor-swift-2635455495.htmlTaylor swiftTime 100Martha stewartJael Goldfine
15 Movies We’re Excited To See at Tribecahttp://www.nojx.tw/movies-tribeca-2019-calendar-2635375532.html

The 2019 Tribeca Film Festival is loaded with big names and must-sees: nostalgic anniversary screenings of Reality Bites and Say Anything, a remastered Apocalypse Now, documentaries about everybody from Trixie Mattel to the Wu Tang Clan to the Parkland shooting survivors.. Also, that movie where a guy wakes up and realizes he's the only person on Earth who remembers any Beatles songs.

None


But with 52 flicks to pick from and just 12 days to cram in as many screenings as possible, the lineup is intimidating — especially if you're looking to support more offbeat projects that aren't destined for wider release.

None


To help you out, we're sharing our calendar. Below, PAPER presents 15 movies to purchase tickets for in advance.

None


Tribeca kicks off Wednesday, April 24, with a screening of Roger Ross Williams' Apollo Theater documentary Apollo.

Burning Cane


The feature debut from director Phillip Youmans, who previously worked with Solange's creative studio on the short film Nairobi, Burning Cane considers the role of family and religion in rural Louisiana. New Orleans-based filmmaker Youmans is a literal prodigy — he finished this movie and his high school diploma at the same time.

Screenings: April 25, 26, 28, May 4

Tickets here

See You Yesterday


Produced by Spike Lee and directed by first timer Stefon Bristol, See You Yesterday is a classic teen time travel movie... about police shootings. Catch it on the big screen before it drops on Netflix.

Screenings: May 3, 4, 5

Tickets here

Blow the Man Down


A Coen brothers-style comedy thriller set in Maine! Why else should you see it? A woman-led cast, plus two female co-writers and directors debuting their first ever feature length film.

Screenings: April 26, 27, May 1, 4, 5

Tickets here

Charlie Says


A Charles Manson movie that doesn't star Margot Robbie or Hillary Duff! It's 50 years since Manson hit headlines, and this documentary goes deep on how he convinced his followers to commit heinous crimes.

Screenings: May 1, 2, 4

Tickets here

None


Related | The Cannes Lineup Includes 13 Female Filmmakers

Extremely Wicked, Shockingly Evil and Vile


ZAC EFRON. AS TED BUNDY.

Screening: May 2

Tickets here

Plus One


A wedding-themed rom-com starring Maya Erskine, one half of PEN15!

Screenings: April 28, 29, 30, 2, 3

Tickets here

Skin


Guy Nattiv won an Oscar for his short film of the same name, now here's the extended version. Skin chronicles the slow redemption story of a Neo Nazi, played by Jamie Bell. The film co-stars Danielle Macdonald, who we love from Patti Cake$ and 'Dumplin'.

Screenings: May 1, 2, 3

Tickets here

Goldie


Starring Rihanna's muse Slick Woods as an aspiring dancer hoping to get her first big break. A Bronx Billy Elliot, with a big fur coat.

Screenings: April 25, 26, 27, May 4

Tickets here

You Don't Nomi


Finally, someone says it: Showgirls was good! Or at least, important. Worthy of re-assessment. You Don't Nomi (perfect pun) is a documentary featuring behind-the-scenes footage from Paul Verhoeven's Last Vegas cult classic, as well as interviews with cast members.

Screenings: April 27, 29, 30

Tickets here

House of Hummingbird


A nostalgic period piece (it's set in 1994) about a teenage girl growing up in Seoul? Sign us up.

Screenings: April 27, 28, May 2, 4

Tickets here

None


Related | Chelsea Manning Documentary 'XY Chelsea' Releases First-Look Trailer

Seahorse


Jeanie Finlay's new documentary chronicles the journey of Freddy McConnell, a transgender father-to-be who decides to biologically carry his child. He must temporarily stop taking testosterone in order to do so — and grapple with what that symbolizes.

Screenings: April 27, 28, May 2

Tickets here

A Woman's Work


What's the NFL without its cheerleaders? That's a question at the heart of several class action lawsuits brought against the league by women who claim wage theft and illegal employment. Their struggle for equality is captured in this documentary from Yu Gu.

Screenings: May 27, 29, May 1, 4

Tickets here

Halston


Iconic designer to the stars Roy Halston gets a cinematic tribute, with bonus Tavi Gevinson.

Screenings: April 28, 29, May 3

Tickets here

Picture Character


A documentary about emojis should be compulsory millennial viewing.

Screenings: April 28, 30, May 2, 5

Tickets here

Wig


The story of Wigstock comes to the big screen! Detailing the history of the annual drag party, Wig is a very New York movie for a very New York film festival.

Screenings: May 4, 5

Tickets here

None


(Bonus picks: Madonna is an executive producer on Lazarus, a movie about a Malawi street musician with albinism, Jared Leto debuts as a director with A Day in the Life of America, and Queen Latifah teams up with Dee Rees for The Queen Collective.)

None


Stills courtesy of Tribeca Film Festival

]]>
Wed, 24 Apr 2019 19:16:55 +0000http://www.nojx.tw/movies-tribeca-2019-calendar-2635375532.htmlMoviesCinemaSay anythingApocalypse nowReality bitesTrixie mattellWu tang clabYesterdayAfter parklandXy chelseaBurning caneSee you yesterdayBlow the man downFemale directorsFemale filmmakersCharlie saysCharles mansonExtremely wickedShockingly evil and vileZac efronPlus oneMaya erskineSkinDanielle macdonaldGoldieSlick woodsShowgirlsYou don't nomiHouse of hummingbirdSeahorseA woman's workHalstonPicture characterWigLazarusMadonnaA day in the life of americaJared letoQueen latifahTribeca film festivalKatherine Gillespie
This Party Is Extremely Fake and Gayhttp://www.nojx.tw/fake-gay-liz-2635383228.html

The resurgence in popularity of the qualities that made pop music great in the '90s — cute synths, earworm choruses, and sleek marketing — have inspired an entire generation to create their own projects with those qualities. That's exactly what San Francisco-based DJ extraordinaire Adam Kraft and drag star Sarah Slay have done for FAKE and GAY.

None


Related | SOPHIE's Whole New World

None


FAKE and GAY started out as a party boosting the hyper-pop and experimental pop scenes at The Stud in San Francisco every third Saturday of the month. Despite starting as a locally-based monthly party, FAKE and GAY took on a life of its own and began popping up in cities nationwide. Performers and DJs are in direct conversation with the new wave of hyper-pop, ushered in by artists like Charli XCX, SOPHIE, and A.G. Cook. The party attracts legendary guests, like Quay Dash, umru, and Dorian Electra, and recently hosted a DJ set from QT.


None


While not officially endorsed or produced by PC Music, despite inviting its star players, FAKE and GAY represents an entire demographic of people, young and old, who are fascinated by the force and weight of the hyper-pop genre. This is precisely why the party is coming to the east coast for its NYC debut at Sunnyvale on Friday, April 26, 2019 with headliner LIZ — who will be premiering new content — and a secret PC Music guest. Adam Kraft will be in attendance, and NYC guests will include Momo Shade, Zenobia, Serena Tea, Dicap, and P_A_T.

None


Related | Charli XCX Is Pop's Cult Leader

None


PAPER caught up Adam Kraft about the party's origins and favorite FAKE and GAY moments. Tickets for the 18+ event on April 26 at Sunnyvale can be purchased here.

None


How did the party first come about?

FAKE and GAY, as any club night I've started, began as a reaction to the club scene around me. Any time I've started some kind of club night or event it's because I have something in mind that I would want to go to that doesn't already exist around me. I wanted to create something new and exciting that was different from the bookings that hopped around from party to party every few months, somewhere people would feel free lose their mind, jump around, and scream along to lyrics, and somewhere that everyone would feel welcome and represented.

None


The name FAKE and GAY stems from an old internet meme as a reaction to the inauthenticity of something posted online. Like, if people saw something dubious or it looked photoshopped, they'd reply "FAKE and GAY." In this case it works perfectly because queerness has also become trendy and buzz worthy, and I've noticed a lot of organizations or events claiming to be "queer" and "all inclusive" with no real representation outside of one particular image — most commonly cis male gay culture.

None


So I wanted to do the opposite. I don't really think of FAKE and GAY as a gay party, I think of it more as taking certain elements you might expect to see at a typical gay party, but heightening and amplifying them, or parodying them, and also giving more space to femme presence, whatever that may look like. I think you can see the actions and bookings on behalf of the party speak louder than the silly ironic name.


None


The artists and DJs you have perform at the party all participate in a similar sound scene of hyper-pop/experimental pop. Why?

I think it's the freshest and most exciting thing right now. I remember hearing SOPHIE's "Bipp" clicking through on Soundcloud when it first was released on Numbers and thinking what the hell is this? Is it good? I can't tell. But I couldn't stop listening. After that I think I went a bit darker with deconstructed club music, but that got repetitive and I got burned out really fast. Then after having DJed with what I like to call, but not limited to, "hyper-pop" artists like SOPHIE, A.G. Cook, and Henrik the Artist within a few months, I developed a strong appreciation and affinity for that hyper-pop sound, which in turn helped me break down the resistance I had toward pop music in general for so long.

None


After developing this new obsession, I saw there wasn't really anywhere featuring it. You could find house and techno anywhere you went and I sought to create a space highlighting that sound since I felt nightlife began to take itself too seriously. I wanted to counteract that by including outstanding recognizable pop music in a setting where you would not normally think to go to hear that kind of stuff. While mashing more experimental "pop" with stuff you'd hear on the radio, my goal as a music selector is to make people question what pop means, and what are the barriers or boundaries, if any? The more I play with that idea the more I realize in a certain context it can be nearly anything.

None


Are all of the Fake and Gay events 18+, like the event at Brooklyn's Sunnyvale on April 26?

This will be the first 18+ party, which I'm excited about. I have gotten so many messages from music fans under 21 who just want to go out and experience their favorite artists in a live setting, but can't because far too often an event's success is dependent on alcohol sales. I wish this weren't the case, but I'm happy to have found Sunnyvale and to make this kind of music more accessible.

None


"I think of [FAKE and GAY] more as taking elements you might expect to see at a typical gay party, but heightening and amplifying them."

None


You recently brought the party to Seattle, and now New York. Are you planning a global expansion?

I hope so! I would love to build something strong enough that allows me to bring more performers and artists to places maybe they wouldn't normally have the opportunity to go. Might have a few things coming up in other cities.

None


Related | Charli XCX Interviews Brazilian Pop Star Pabllo Vittar

None


What are a few of your favorite moments or memories from the parties?

Any time Nicki Jizz hits the stage is an uproar. Especially during our Bubblegum Bass Battle lip sync tournament — her lip syncing against Vanilla Carter to Charli XCX's "Vroom Vroom" was jaw-droppingly spectacular. Everyone's mouths were agape in disbelief. If that was on Drag Race it would probably be in one of those top best lip syncs of all time lists. You can watch the battles on vimeo.com/fakeandgayinc. Other crazy favorite moments were beautiful perfectly timed mistakes. During the Pop 2 tribute as soon as Frida Mont was about to start her part as Pabllo Vittar in "I Got It" on the opposing stage in the back all the lights went out! I was in the lighting booth freaking out and screaming "HELP!" but I think I everyone just thought it was like a positive "YASSSSS!" kind of scream. Everyone without hesitation pulled out their phones and lit her and then back to the other stage for the rest of the song. It made for such a dramatic moment. The lights miraculously came back on before "Femmebot" started.

None


Another perfect mistake was after QT finished DJing, I went back on to DJ and played "Immaterial" by SOPHIE. Right before the first chorus dropped the mixer died, but again everyone thought it was intentional, so the whole room started shouting "IM-MA, MA-MATERIAL" and continued throughout the chorus and maybe into the verse. I was screaming, "HELP," naturally, and again everyone thought it was an encouraging "YAS" scream. Eventually after everyone realized what happened, I played the song off an iPod or something, and once the mixer switched out played it again on the CDJ. It was a hilarious mess and really fun, which is actually a fair description of the party itself.

None


Photography: Mitchell Harrison (Courtesy of FAKE & GAY)

]]>
Wed, 24 Apr 2019 17:46:33 +0000http://www.nojx.tw/fake-gay-liz-2635383228.htmlLizCharli xcxSophiePabllo vittarFake and gayLgbtqNightlifeAdam kraftBrendan Wetmore
Elisabeth Moss on Playing Tortured Geniuses and Unlikeable Womenhttp://www.nojx.tw/her-smell-elisabeth-moss-interview-2635301967.html

Hollywood loves a tortured genius. Especially if he's in a rock band. Look at just about any music biopic, or those about Mozart or Van Gogh or Pollock, or even A Star Is Born's paradoxically immortal Jackson Maine. The implied gender pronoun is among the reasons why it feels so radical to watch a glitter and mascara-smeared Elisabeth Moss "be the cowboy," to borrow a burgeoning music metaphor, in her new film Her Smell.

None


Directed by her frequent collaborator Alex Ross Perry, Her Smell sees Moss as a cowboy, of sorts: a Courtney Love-Amy Winehouse-Marilyn Monroe pastiche named Becky Something. She's the egomaniacal, brilliant, cruel frontwoman of fictional grunge-Riot Grrrl band Something She. Over the film's 90 minutes, fueled by an ego of the scale not just tolerated but worshipped in her male counterparts, Becky swaggers, enchants, wreaks havoc, and pontificates in a cerebral, cosmic dialect of her own invention.


None


She also gobbles up the life-force of everyone around her, from her bandmates (Agyness Deyn, Gayle Rankin) to her mother to her wannabe protégés The Acker Girls (Cara Delevingne, Ashley Benson, Dylan Gelula), who the label picks up to offset the costs of Something She's perpetually delayed record. Becky takes sole credit for her band's success, blows their royalties on a fraud shaman who hands her chakra-related rationalizations for her cruelty, passes out drunk while holding her infant daughter and at one point, tries to stab one of her bandmates. One by one, they all leave. It's not an easy watch.

None


The rare permission and screen-time that Becky is given to rant and rave (in well-crafted dialogue), to be as mythic and epic and tortured and absurd and depraved as the guys, is gratifying, for sure. But it never feels good. The abrasive, eponymously pungent film goes down like a gulp of glass shards, in comparison (as it keeps finding itself, as the Big Music Movie follow-up) to A Star Is Born's hot chocolate.

None


Related | The Rise of the Vulnerable Heroine

None


Becky's confronted with rare, commensurate and unsexy consequences (bankruptcy, lawsuits, child support, bad skin) to her destructive antics, but she's also not cartoonishly wretched. Thanks to Moss's superb performance and Ross Perry's brutal script, Her Smell nimbly navigates the line between moralistic cautionary tale and triumphant martyr story. It acknowledges larger-than-life female genius, without mistaking feminist progress for changing the pronouns in a story about bad behavior.

None


For one, Becky has to stick around and slowly, awkwardly clean up her mess instead of being granted a swift, poetic exit (which she romanticizes for herself: "I always thought I'd die on stage"). Her Smell not only doesn't rest on, but actively shuns, all the admittedly pleasurable clichés of the genre: the rise-to-fame sprint, glory days montage, raucous concert scenes and drug benders are all snippets. Becky's already a creatively-blocked addict when we meet her, and spends most of the movie backstage, screaming horrible things at people who love her. The film ends with a tense reunion show which sees our cowgirl, only at the last second, begin to make amends, and consider a life that won't end in flames.

None


Without any schematic crutches, Moss was responsible for bringing to life this relentless, brutally human character who, despite her patchwork inspirations, we've never seen on-screen before.

None


PAPER spoke with Moss about how she did it, 90's nostalgia and playing unlikeable women.

None


You've said you weren't into Riot Grrrl or punk growing up. What was your perception of it before Her Smell and what was your perception after wrapping the shoot?

None


I was the generation afterwards, you know — the Britney Spears, *NSYNC generation. So my perspective of it was that it was music for teenagers who were way cooler than me. And not even like the Riot Grrrl movement, I'm talking about, like, Nirvana, Oasis. The Riot Grrrls, I don't think I even knew about [them] when I was like ten or eleven. So, preparing for the film was such an interesting education and a learning curve. It's the kind of music that is so specific to that time that you really do feel like you learn so much about that time period, the '90s, that era just from that music alone.

None


What did you feel like you learned about the '90s?

None


Just the dissatisfaction, the sense of anger, of pain. Especially young people: they were dissatisfied, no one was listening to them. Especially from the women in the Riot Grrrl movement, they were just as hardcore and just as punk as the men, if not more sometimes honestly, and they had so much to say and put it in their music. There's a full resistance that was happening from just that group of women and just that group of music.

None


None


I feel like there's more and more nostalgia for that era that you portray — Bikini Kill is going on tour and L7's putting out an album. Why do you think that is?

None


Perhaps we're just on schedule, like we went through the '80s and are moving forward. It wasn't until recently that we were able to be nostalgic about the early '90s. The people who lived through that time are now old enough to have some introspection about it, to look at it as something that was epic. As we look at our own lives right now, it doesn't seem that exciting, it doesn't seem like anything that's really particular to the era or the generation. But when you look back, you're able to go, "Oh, that was so of that time."

None


How did you become Becky Something? What was that preparation like?

None


I did the usual, watching a lot of documentaries and music videos. But I didn't just focus on the music scene. I focused on anything drug-related I could get, you know. I watched the Amy documentary [about Amy Winehouse], we watched the Oasis documentary, we watched a lot of Marilyn Monroe stuff. The Andy Kauffman, Jim Carrey documentary, which was really interesting and really influential to me. It just kind of came out and I watched it at the exact right time. And you know, that person that Andy Kaufman created, that persona, that thing that he created that was for everyone else, I thought was very Becky. That way you kind of couldn't tell — was it all an act? Or was it intentional? Was he actually on a different plane than the rest of us?

None


I read you watched videos of drug users and addicts.

Yeah for sure. I watched a ton of YouTube videos, because I didn't want to just…of course I tried to look for movies that had similar performances in them. And I watched Boogie Nights and Goodfellas and Wolf of Wall Street. But I didn't want to just copy what another actor had done. I wanted to watch real videos of real people, specifically on meth, which there's surprisingly a lot of videos out there. I wanted it to be as realistic as possible.

None


"I didn't want to just copy what another actor had done... I wanted it to be as realistic as possible."

None


You've said Becky was one of the hardest roles you've ever played. Why?

None


I would say a couple things. One, the energy that it requires — there's no middle ground with Becky. She's either going 100 miles an hour, or she's completely stuck in the mud. There were no scenes or moments that were like, "Oh, this is kind of easy, I'll just take it easy on this one." There was a lot of insane dialogue that I had to know that didn't make a lot of sense and if I messed up and said the right word, it wouldn't make sense. Alex was really specific about it, and wanted these lines to be really specific. He wanted it to be perfect, so that was another interesting challenge, just that language that she speaks in is so unusual.

None


It's crazy to hear that so much precision went into those diatribes. They feel so spontaneous.

None


They were extremely precise, because Becky is extremely smart, she's very intelligent. Her references are right on, she has an encyclopedic knowledge of pop culture. Even her cruelty is very specific. It's not a rambling voice, it's not a monologue, it doesn't go nowhere, it's so, so specific. There were no dialogue changes, no ad lib, no improv, it was all deliberate.

None


None


What do you think is Her Smell's contribution to that conversation about the trope of the mad genius?

None


There's certain people that just, sort of, exist on a different plane. They need more stimulation, they need more attention obviously. I think we're all familiar with them. At some point we've all met that person who has this insane combination of extreme confidence and no self-esteem. It makes a very toxic, terrible combination. And Becky just doesn't know how to be socially acceptable. She's this crazy storm, and also, a brilliant artist. She's a genius, and she knows she's a genius.

None


Do you think part of the project of the film was to demonstrate or explore that women get to play those roles and are entitled to that story too?

Absolutely, yeah. If Becky was a man, I don't know what the story would be. It would be like, "Okay, what's the point?She's just like every other rock star musician that we've ever heard of." But as a woman and a mother, it becomes unusual or at least what we think of as unusual, but it wasn't. The truth of that era and that music was, like I said, the woman were rougher than the men, more hardcore. Becky is almost genderless in a way. She doesn't use her sexuality or identify with it to get her anywhere. She doesn't rely on that all. She doesn't shy away from it, but it just doesn't matter to her, nor does it kind of matter to everyone else.

None


You often play unlikeable women. Do you seek out those roles, or do they come to you?

I think it's probably a combination. I'm more challenged by and attracted to conflict and drama and that's more interesting to me. As far as unlikeable… that's an interesting question. It's an interesting concept. It's never a part of my thought process, I don't think about whether or not somebody like Becky is likable or unlikeable. My job is to help you to understand her, not like her. As far as if I like her, I don't make a judgement either way. The only way that that would enter my thought process, is in the sense of "does the character like themselves?" But to be honest, I usually like them, because I find something I identify with in them. I'm in their heads, I understand why they do the things they do and behave the way they do, and that makes me like them.

None


"I don't think about whether or not somebody like Becky is likable... My job is to help you to understand her, not like her."

None


Have you ever gotten to play a righteous, beloved heroine?

None


I'd say June from Handmaid's Tale is close. She's a pretty straightforward heroine. But she's also flawed and interesting and complex, and doesn't always do the right thing. I think that's true of people, unless you're literally like a superhero or something, from a comic book movie, I don't know if there are people that are completely perfect, who do the right thing all the time.

None


People have been positioning Her Smell as a foil to A Star Is Born. What do you make of the comparison?

None


If anything, Alex and I have a joke: "If you like, A Star Is Born, you'll love Her Smell" because they're obviously so, so different. Basically, it's not true at all... If you like A Star Is Born, maybe you'll hate Her Smell [laughs]. That was the big challenge, to do a unique take on the story of a rock star and an addict. That was why we wanted to start at the point of her demise, and not bother with her rise to fame, and not bother with how she was discovered and all that, because... then we'd be making A Star Is Born! They already did that.

None


Yeah, the absent glory days felt so original. There's also almost no on-screen drug use. Was there a conversation about that?

None


Yeah, that was a very conscious decision. The whole question with this story is, what are we going to do that hasn't been done? How are we going to show it? What, are we gonna have them doing coke off the table, and shoot it from underneath the table, through the glass? It's all been done. We've seen it all. And it's also not what the movie's about. The movie's about this woman who — firstly, sometimes is probably not on anything — and is just acting like that because it's fun. The choice gave us freedom. Like if we show her popping a pill then we have to follow up on that for the next 20 minutes. Instead, we were able to be like, "Well, I don't know, she could have been on a bender for five days." There are moments when she maybe gets into a back room or whatever, but without actually showing these cliché boring drug scenes, we were able to do whatever we wanted.

None


None


You produced Her Smell, and you executive produce on Handmaid's Tale. What has working as a producer been like?

None


I also produced Queen of Earth, my last film. God, at this point, [I've produced] two music videos, another film last summer that was after Her Smell. Producing is a very normal part of my job and my life now. It just gives me an entirely new and deeper perspective on the entire project. It's hard for me now to be involved in something that I'm not a producer on; especially if I'm the lead in something, it feels like I'm cutting off one of my arms. It's not about control, but to not have that collaboration, to not have that discussion or to be involved in the various elements that happen before you start filming, I feel like I'm viewing something from the outside, rather than the inside when that happens. It's something that's such a seamless part of my normal day job (acting), they go so hand-in-hand now.

None


Have you ever thought about directing your own films?

None


I've thought about it more recently than I have in the past. But I'm also really happy with acting and producing. I would want it to be a story that I really wanted to tell and only I could tell it as a director. I don't think I've found that yet. I've thought about directing on Handmaid's at some point, as a start, because obviously I'm so familiar with the show already. Maybe I'll do that, but I don't know, I already have [laughs] a lot to do.

None


Photos courtesy of Gunpowder & Sky

]]>
Wed, 24 Apr 2019 17:22:32 +0000http://www.nojx.tw/her-smell-elisabeth-moss-interview-2635301967.htmlHer smellBecky somethingAlex ross perryAgyness deynGayle rankinCara delevingneAshley bensonDylan gelulaElisabeth mossJael Goldfine
This Influencer Faked Her Whole Coachella Triphttp://www.nojx.tw/fake-coachella-gabbie-hanna-influencer-2635429966.html

Most people are just going to Coachella for the gram, right? Right. Musician and YouTuber Gabbie Hanna has long been a critic of the festival for this very reason, so her followers were understandably confused when she started posting pictures in Indio this past weekend. Turns out all her photos were photoshopped — she faked the whole trip to prove a point about social media sharing.

None


Related | Assless Chaps Are the New Flower Crown at Coachella

None


Hanna detailed the whole experiment in a vlog uploaded yesterday, explaining that Coachella in general "feels like a lot of work for something you're not enjoying." So she decided to "get the best of both worlds" by getting her Coachella posts without paying for tickets or spending three days waiting for Ubers back and forth between her AirBnB and the main stage.


None


"I know people who double up their outfits on the first weekend and take photos so they can pretend to go to both weekends," she explained. "So what i'm doing is not that far from reality."

None


Related | Inside Coachella's 'Most Exclusive' Party

None


The influencer staged her Coachella photos at a friend's house (emulating a chic AirBnB), and on a lawn at Marina del Rey. Posing in colorful wigs and appropriately tiny booty shorts, she photoshopped Coachella crowds into the background of each image. Thousands of people were fooled — in the age of filters and portrait mode, Hanna's slightly blurred fellow festival goers didn't raise any questions.


None


A social media stunt that will go down in history alongside the Justin Bieber sideways burrito incident, for sure. If you can't afford a ticket next year, consider this cheaper alternative — Hanna said she ended up having "a lot of fun" during the shoot, and gained "a better understanding of why people go to Coachella."


None


Photo via Instagram

]]>
Wed, 24 Apr 2019 17:06:35 +0000http://www.nojx.tw/fake-coachella-gabbie-hanna-influencer-2635429966.htmlGabbie hannaInfluencerInstagramFestivalMusicAriana grandeKanye westYoutubeVloggingStuntJustin bieberCoachella 2019Katherine Gillespie
Britney Spears Breaks Silence to Say She's Okayhttp://www.nojx.tw/britney-spears-is-ok-2635391044.html

Over the last few weeks, concern over perpetually surveilled pop legend Britney Spears' mental health has reach feverish levels since it was reported that she was being held in a mental health facility against her will. #FreeBritney began trending as dubious conspiracy theories sparked fan fears of a repeat of 2007, the year she infamously shaved her head and was taken to UCLA Medical. Early the following year her conservatorship under her father began and has reportedly been in effect since.

None


The 37-year-old's father, Jamie Spears, is legally in charge approving Britney's personal and financial decisions, along with her lawyer Andrew M. Wallet, co-conservator of her estate — that is, until March 4, 2019, when Wallet quit. That, along with Jamie Spears undergoing serious medical issues and a seemingly sudden silence on the part of Britney (she also put her Las Vegas residency on hold in response to her father's illness) added considerable kindling to the conspiracy bonfire. Additionally, comedians and co-creators of the Britney's Grampodcast, Tess Barker and Barbara Gray, claimed in an episode last week that they received "an anonymous tip from a credible source" alleging Spears was being held in a mental health facility against her will.

None


Britney, though, took to Instagram tonight to post a video and lengthy caption assuring fans that she is okay, and making a plea for some privacy.

"I wanted to say hi, because things that are being said have just gotten out of control!!! Wow!!! There's rumors, death threats to my family and my team, and just so many things crazy things being said," she wrote. "Don't believe everything you read and hear," and went on to address alleged emails making the rounds that purport to be from the singer. "I am trying to take a moment for myself, but everything that's happening is just making it harder for me. Don't believe everything you read and hear. These fake emails everywhere were crafted by Sam Lutfi years ago... I did not write them. He was pretending to be me and communicating with my team with a fake email address. My situation is unique, but I promise I'm doing what's best at this moment ?????? You may not know this about me, but I am strong, and stand up for what I want! Your love and dedication is amazing, but what I need right now is a little bit of privacy to deal with all the hard things that life is throwing my way. If you could do that, I would be forever grateful. Love you"



Photo via Getty

]]>
Wed, 24 Apr 2019 02:27:11 +0000http://www.nojx.tw/britney-spears-is-ok-2635391044.htmlFreebritneyJamie spearsBritney spearsClaire Valentine
Coolest Person in the Room: Phillip Basonehttp://www.nojx.tw/coolest-person-phillip-basone-2635383218.html

Popularity is relative, and especially in the digital age. You could have hundreds of thousands of followers online, but be completely unknown in the streets — massively famous on Instagram, YouTube or Twitter, but lack any kind of real, authentic cool in person. For our new series, Coolest Person in the Room, New York-based photographer Megan Walschlager pinpoints all the people whose energy is contagious regardless of their following count or celebrity. Meet Phillip Basone – the NYC-based chef with a Rick Owens habit.

None


Related | Coolest Person in the Room: Lauren Servideo

None


Tell us about your day job:

I am a chef. Right now I work at a restaurant in Chelsea called Elmo. I'm the executive chef and pastry chef, so I run it all and manage the whole thing. The food is super-American – not like a diner really, but there are so many options.

None


How did you get to where you are now?

I've been working in restaurants forever. I remember I was like 14 when I got my first restaurant job, and it was like cleaning squid for calamari, washing dishes and making salad dressing at the fanciest Italian restaurant in my town.

Where are you from?

Connecticut. I left like two weeks after I graduated to come here [NYC] for culinary school when I was 18. Then basically it all started at Barbuto. I had my internship there when I was in school, then I became a line cook, then I quit, then I moved to Philadelphia, then back to New York –

What were you doing in Philadelphia? Was that when you were testing kitchen appliances with old ladies?

No, that was like when I moved back to NYC and started working at Barbuto again, then quit again. I still don't really know why they let me in there. But then I was at a point where I didn't really want to work in restaurants, but I didn't go to college so all I had was this food degree, so I started interning at Saveur Magazine in the test kitchens just testing recipes and they would have me write some articles here and there.

None


And then that turned into me meeting all these older women in the food magazine world. I ended up at Good Housekeeping and the test kitchen there was too full because the women would never want to leave those jobs once they got it, so they put me into the appliance area and it was literally just like testing anything food related with a science kind of background. Like what Tupperware is the least stain-resistant? So, I would literally microwave like a million different kinds of Tupperware with tomato sauce, empty it out and dish wash it, take it out and record it. And that's what I did for weeks. But I was also 21 and the money was pretty good and it was kind of cute. I didn't even know this existed as a job.

None


None


And that's in New York, right?

Yeah, it's in the Condé Nast building, so it's like this super glamorous – the whole floor is all appliances and anything kitchen related. And it was fun to test out appliances because now I know, like, what I want to buy.

Then I went back to Barbuto and I was the sous chef there for two weeks and then Jonathon [Waxman], the owner, was like, "Okay we're gonna make you the chef now." And then a few weeks after that they opened another restaurant and pulled the pastry chef, so I became the pastry chef as well. I was there for a year and a half and that was definitely the highlight of my career by far.

None


So, does being the executive chef mean you get to set the menu?

It totally depends on where you're working. At Barbuto, Jonathon gave me a lot of free reign, but of course I had to stay within some sort of context of the restaurant — of being like seasonal and Italian, and everything he represents. Then when I moved to San Francisco for him, I had real full reign on the menu, but keeping in mind kind of what he would do and what he would want. But I also worked for that man for 8 years, so I kinda knew what he wanted at that point.

None


I watch a lot of food documentaries on Netflix, and I have gathered in my amateur food knowledge that it is not typical for a chef to both cook and bake — is that true?

Mmm, a lot of the really successful chefs that I've met — like Jonathan Waxman — he started baking breads and loved pastry and then became a chef. Then Justin Smillie, who I've worked with at Upland, obviously knew how to do pastry and is amazing with breads. So I always looked up to them like, if you want to be an owner of your own restaurant, then you need to know how to do everything. But more importantly you need to do it better than everyone who works for you. So I was always like, I want to be the best, I want to learn everything. And baking is fun — it's so much more zen. If you give yourself a day out of your work schedule to bake, then it's really appealing.


None


How did you get interested in cooking?

Honestly it's kind of sad, but also kind of whatever. I just didn't really have any friends when I was little, and I would just watch the Food Network after school and start mimicking what they would do on TV. We had a little TV in our kitchen and I would just watch the Emeril Live show. It would replay at 3pm the next day and that's when I would watch it because we weren't allowed to stay up 'till 9. Then it just got to a point where my mom would take me to the grocery store and be like, "Get what you need to get to fix dinner."

None


How old were you?

I was 13 or 14 when I really started making, like, full meals for my family. And also my parents don't really cook either, so they were both really on board with someone cooking at home. So they were totally supportive from the beginning. They're really cool.

What is your favorite thing to cook?

I love to make lasagna and home-y type of things. Lasagna is also my favorite thing to eat too, so I think that's why I like to make it so much. And I love to make pernil. My ex-boyfriend was Puerto Rican and his family taught me how to make it. It's the whole pork shoulder with crispy skin — it's just so moist and delicious. I used to make that for the boys a lot when they would come over for dinner because it's so easy. And honestly I just hate to butcher things — like at work. That's my least favorite thing about being a chef. I always get in trouble with that, but I'm, always honest in my interviews: I hate butchering and I'm not very good at it. Just giving you a heads up.

None


Well, we all have our strengths and weaknesses! You also have a relationship with New York nightlife — how did you get involved with that?

Well, I started going out when I was 18 when I moved to NYC — so don't come for me for being underage, I guess.

I don't think you can retroactively get kicked out of the club.

None


I met this boy when I first moved here on gay.com. It was basically a MySpace type format but for gay guys in major cities. And I met this guy off it and he used to take me to Greenhouse and Markus [Kelle] used to do the door there and I instantly fell in love with him and was obsessed with everything about him. I thought he was one of the coolest people I had ever met. And he was always really sweet to me and would let me in and help me out. From there, he would do so many parties, so it was like wherever Markus was, I would go because I could get in. Some nights — like at Westgay, I would literally stand outside all night and just bullshit with him — I wouldn't even step foot into the party.

None


None


Do you have specific going out routines?

Not really. I hate to say it but I will try to skip dinner. Like if I know I'm going out I will have breakfast and go to the gym, and then it's just liquids from then on. I always do a face mask, but other than that it's not that serious.

What is your go to drink?

Tequila and water.

Not soda?

No.

Why not?

I just like water better.

None


Alright. What about ice?

Ice for sure. It has to be cold. And a lime. I hate when they give me lemon. I hate lemon and tequila actually. But I mean if someone gives that to me, I'm not not gonna drink it.

Right. So, what's your schedule like as a chef? I assume you're not working 9-5.

It's either shifted way earlier or way later. Typical hours are like 7am to 7pm or 11am to close — which is like 1am. Right now I can sort of make my own hours as long as I meet a weekly minimum, but at Barbuto I was working like 11am-1am.

None


Do you like that?

Yes and no. I love not working on Mondays and being able to do everything that I wanted to do while no one is around — like the gym is empty no matter what. But I hate working Saturday nights or having to wake up after a Friday night out and having to go in to work on a Saturday while everyone is like, "Let's go to brunch and be cute while we're all hungover!" And I'm just stuck at work by myself. So it always denied me the social life I wanted — I've always had to make the extra effort to go into work the night after going out or else I wouldn't really have a life, but I'm still here and it hasn't killed me yet.

None


My Netflix food research has also taught me there is a nightlife ring comprised of all restaurant workers that go out together after the restaurants close — can you confirm if this is true?

Totally true. I used to go to that, but it's like, would I rather be with all my gay friends or would I rather be with a bunch of chefs' bullshitting about food? Honestly, I'd rather be with my friends. And that's just me being a young gay guy trying to be a chef in New York.

None


Your personal style is very like goth, Rick Owens — do you wear that under your chef jacket?

That is so ridiculous. I would never.

What do you wear? Your off duty look is like head to toe Rick Owens — do you own things that are not Rick Owens?

I do own some things that are not Rick Owens. I wish I could say I didn't because that would be the craziest thing in the world and I would gag over myself. I just need to make like an extra $100,000 for that to happen.

But, no I literally wear a wife beater or sometimes nothing. Those things are hot. It is a shirt, so I don't think you need to wear something under it. Then I wear these baggy cotton chef pants and I wear Crocs. Hideous Crocs.

None


What do you think are the coolest spots in New York?

I'm a big breakfast sandwich guy, so literally right across the street at Murray's Cheese, they have these two little griddles and they make the best sandwiches in the world. I've eaten thousands of them. I get butter-toasted bread, scrambled egg whites with avocado, but I add bacon and cheese to it. It's this really good Swiss cheese. But they just make it so well. I think it's just a shit-ton of butter that they put on it or something. I always bring everyone there and they agree that they're the best. I also love Molé in the West Village for Mexican food — it also has my Mexican boyfriend Victor's stamp of approval so that's usually what we eat. If I'm feeling cute, then I love to go to the Standard Bar and Grill.

None


Really?

Everyone responds like that when I say that's my favorite restaurant.

I've never been there and I've never thought that it might be good which is why it surprises me.

I love it. I just think it's really chic and it's all my favorite things when it comes to food.

None


Do you sit outside?

Inside, outside, at the bar — whatever. It's like oysters on the half shell, amazing cocktails, shrimp cocktail and an NY strip. That's all my favorite things and I'm very happy. Whenever it's my birthday or date night with Victor, that's where we go.

I also love to go to kitchen supply stores. I love to go up and down Bowery and go to all those random places. I have a big collection of plates and little cups and stuff, because I used to really love taking pictures of food and I would obviously need like a rusty old fork and a tin plate for those, so I would go to Junk in Brooklyn a lot. I love it there. They just have millions of plates and cups.

None


None


Do you have a favorite kitchen item?

I love my blender just because I use it all the time. I have a stand mixer — the one with a million attachments. I'm into that because it's like a juicer, a grinder, you can roll pasta, make cookies — it's all in one.

What's next for you?

My goal for the summer is actually to find an outdoor space — I don't know exactly what I want it to be — but like some sort of pop-up food thing. I'm kind of at the place in my career where I don't know if I want my own restaurant, but I want a place that brings people together through food and I don't want it to necessarily be this super high-end tasting menu, like how I've down at other pop-ups. I kind of just want it to be this fun, outdoor space where there's really good food there, but also brings all my friends together not at a club at 2am. I would love to do a monthly summer BBQ party with all my friends — and even if I just had one grill I could make it work.

None


I feel like you have exceptional work experience as a chef for your age.

Uh, well, I definitely was so proud when I became a chef at Barbuto because I was 22 and that was kind of unheard of. In hindsight I was like way too young to have that job [laughs], I totally admit it. But I do know how to cook and I'm very cocky about that, I guess you could say. I do know how to cook. And it is kind of a weird industry that's so hard to navigate and figure out what you want for yourself, so that's why I am trying to do things like this.

Would you want to have your own restaurant?

I do, but what I want is so specific in a way it definitely would not make me a lot of money, just being realistic. But if I could have it, I totally would.

None


Follow Phillip Basone on Instagram (@_phillip_basone).


]]>
Tue, 23 Apr 2019 23:46:00 +0000http://www.nojx.tw/coolest-person-phillip-basone-2635383218.htmlBarbutoStandard bar and grillCoolest person in the roomPhillip basoneInterview & Photography Megan Walschlager
Hilma af Klint's Queer Clairvoyancehttp://www.nojx.tw/hilma-af-klint-guggenheim-2635306186.html

Clairvoyance is the ability to see beyond the immediate into another time and place, to the then and there. To see clearly is to see how things truly are. Tuning in to a frequency where it is safe to transmit messages, recognizing the meaning of a certain color in a certain back pocket, turning to dead generations to find others who share your secret: these are forms of extrasensory attention practiced by queer people.

None


I thought of queer clairvoyance amidst the rainbows of the Hilma af Klint show, closing soon at the Guggenheim. I wanted to drink the color, as if the dusty lavenders and burnt oranges could nourish me. I stopped to consider a shape that might have been a yellow blossom or an egg, and realized: "I want it inside me?"

None


My partner cocked her head. "I want to be inside it."

"More like Hilma As Fuck."

We spiraled up the exhibit, trying to put our finger on what made the art, to us, unquestionably queer. I had a vague memory of hearing that af Klint was a lesbian, but I couldn't place whether I had actually heard it or if it was simply a message received.

None


How would it shape our understanding of af Klint's art if the show made her queerness central to understanding her vision of the future?

None


In the months that the show has been up, I waited to see if anyone else would draw that connection between af Klint's sexuality and her vision of the future, and no one did. It felt like af Klint's queerness was a ghost in the show.

Calling af Klint queer is a delicate claim. We only have the usual signs to go by: never married, lived only with women, enjoyed intimate lifelong friendships with women, communed with other astral planes only with women. There are no salacious diaries or letters available, no rumors of her alleged lesbianism, as there are with the founder of Theosophy, Helena Blavatsky. When you research her, you either find no references to her sexuality at all, or you see her, here and there, claimed plainly as gay. Here she appears in the Lavender Review of lesbian poetry and art; here she is on the LGBT Daily Spotlight.

None


None


Af Klint's work as a Spiritualist medium, like queerness, was an attunement to signals others didn't pick up. And as with her queerness, her mysticism has been less of a critical preoccupation: too messy, too biographical, too woo.

How would it shape our understanding of af Klint's art if the show made her queerness central to understanding her vision of the future? Erasing her queerness is not merely a problem of representation, but a roadblock for interpreting her work. The critical reluctance to make any claims about what her art does or what kind of future she imagined has everything to do with ignoring the queer implications of her work.

None


Perhaps because the show is titled Paintings for the Future, critics have tended to defer to af Klint's vision for the future rather than making their own conjectures as to what kind of future, exactly, she envisioned. Peter Schjeldahl, for instance, writes in his New Yorker review, "I don't know what to do with or about it. Maybe some of our artists will. Meanwhile, looking seems a good start." Jillian Steinhauer offers that af Klint helps you "open yourself up to an unfamiliar and more expansive way of seeing the world." Roberta Smith observes that even if af Klint got "there" first in pioneering abstract art, her "'there' seems so radical, so unlike anything else going on at the time." Why is it so hard to put a finger on where "there" is, to name the kind of future she imagines? Why have so many reviews of her work amounted to nothing more than a marketable slogan: the future is female?

None


If you are attuned to a certain frequency, you can receive the kind of queer future af Klint envisions. But if you are too mired in the here and now as opposed to the then and there, you might not pick up what af Klint puts down. Not everyone is clairvoyant. If most critics have brushed aside her queerness along with the mystical implications of her work as speculative concerns, at best, then perhaps not everyone is spiritually commissioned to receive her messages.

None


Related | Damon Davis' Darker Gods Imagines a New Black Mythology

None


For Hyperallergic, John Yau comes close to calling her queer when he compares her decision to withhold her work from the public until two decades after her death to Emily Dickinson's own reluctance to publish her poetry in her lifetime. Both have been treated by critics as unsexed recluses, in spite of their respectively intense relationships with women.

None


And as with Dickinson, critics have treated af Klint's vision of the future as hyper contemporary and yet impossibly distant, a horizon that we can see but not reach. It's a familiar kind of future for queer people who aspire towards a liberation that would mean a form of life so radically different it is almost unimaginable. Over the rainbow, somewhere.

None


It is as if she could only process a binary sexuality on the subatomic level, and call it chaos.

None


Af Klint's vision of the future is not one that reproduces more of the same. While her work does play with binaries, including the one that pairs up the masculine and feminine, her investment is in the alchemical union of opposites to create something new. She takes up a gendered sense of color — yellow for "male" and blue for "female," green for the harmony of the two — only to name her series of biomorphic forms Primordial Chaos. Her series of canvases struck me as a form of processing, of working through a complicated subject and examining it from every angle and distance. Diagramming, for af Klint, is a way of breaking down the world into its component parts and processing these parts to arrive at a new conclusion. It is as if she could only process a binary sexuality on the subatomic level, and call it chaos.

None


While male and female bodies may combine to create more male and female bodies, af Klint treats such biology with the eye of a diagrammer, not a sensualist. Contrast this nonsexed creation of life with her Eros Series: a gradation of pink and lavender, a fluid sensuality of shape and color. Reproductive and erotic are not synonymous in her book.

None


None


To appreciate af Klint's work is to disregard an art-historical narrative of direct lineage, of artist responding to artist. Instead of a vertical model of inheritance, her work suggests a horizontal model of community collaboration. She was interested in order and structure, but not necessarily hierarchy: "It was not the case that I was to blindly obey the High Lords of the Mysteries," she said, "but that I was to imagine that they were always standing by my side." Even her mediumship was horizontally organized.

None


Af Klint's vision of the future has deep roots in the past, as her Spiritualist practice suggests. To contact the dead, after all, is to communicate with lost elders, a queer project in itself. Perhaps this is why af Klint appears as a figure of fascination for Kristen Stewart's character, Maureen, in Olivier Assayas' film Personal Shopper. Maureen is a medium, too, and like the painter, seeks to contact a dead sibling but receives messages from a more ambiguous source. Maureen's queerness is notable only if you know what you're looking for — her tepidity with a male suitor, her Shane affect — but there is a direct line between her ability to commune with the unseen, the magnetism that pulls her towards af Klint, and the unspoken object of her sexuality.

None


Af Klint's work is a collaborative effort between women and the unseen world. Making her queerness explicit in the show would also allow her audience to understand why she was uninterested in being put in a mainstream lineage of artist begetting artist. Her decision not to show her work until twenty years after her death is a queer refusal of parenthood, favoring her lived community of both earthly and heavenly bodies.

None


As with queerness, the occult is a body of knowledge, welcoming only to those who wish to be initiated, that has in recent years been exploited by capitalism. If we do not discuss af Klint's lesbianism in line with her art, we forget that she and her Spiritualist collective were queer practitioners of the occult, not straight women dabbling in woo or influencers who use aesthetic as an adjective. Her contemporary queer audience, like the Spiritualists before her, can see what others can't and receive messages about the future from voices of the past.

Lead image: Installation view: Hilma af Klint: Paintings for the Future, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, October 12, 2018–April 23, 2019, Photo: David Heald

]]>
Tue, 23 Apr 2019 22:49:01 +0000http://www.nojx.tw/hilma-af-klint-guggenheim-2635306186.htmlHilma af klintNatalie Adler
The Millionaires Walked So Kesha Could Runhttp://www.nojx.tw/millionaires-kesha-myspace-2634994820.html

When Melissa Marie first heard Kesha's debut single "Tik Tok," she thought it was her own voice. The squeaky slur of "wake up in the morning feelin' like P Diddy," the trashy lyrics about brushing her teeth with Jack Daniels, the way Kesha moved between speaking and speak-singing like a hangover prevented her from giving more — it'd all become Melissa's signature as part of her three-girl Myspace band Millionaires. Only now that model was being blasted through Top 40 radio, and would eventually catapult Kesha to global pop star status.

None


"I got messages from people in my high school saying, 'You're on the radio!' And I was like, 'That's fucking not us,'" Melissa says. "I remember being so pissed off. I thought it was myself singing, it was that close."

None


In the context of 2009 Myspace, the biggest social media platform at the time, the Millionaires had become notorious. Melissa, sister Allison Greene and their close friend Dani Artaud were all internet-famous with hundreds of thousands of combined "friends" (this was before followers), and they joined forces to make an electro-pop trio that began as a joke, but became serious by demand. The earnest emo nerds, screamo misogynists, and leftover indie-rock snobs of Myspace all loved to hate the Millionaires, yet the girls' tracks consistently landed in Myspace Music's top charts. Constant criticism fueled epic numbers online, and so the Millionaires became an early product of the same system of polarizing popularity that fueled the careers of stars like Paris Hilton and Kim Kardashian.

None


Related | Amazon Fashion Secrets: The #20ninescene Edition

None


It was rumored that among the Millionaires' listeners was producer Dr. Luke, who is credited for helping develop Kesha's initial look and sound (and accused of abusing her throughout their professional partnership). "We worked with producers in the [music] industry, so we heard all the gossip," Melissa says, claiming that "Dr. Luke had admitted to someone that he stole our whole persona." It makes sense: mainstream radio of that era was still dominated by the likes of high-fashion auteur Lady Gaga and textbook hitmaker Britney Spears, but the party girl image — messy, low-brow, relatable — had yet to be tapped into. So if the Millionaires could independently cultivate a fanbase for their sex positive, drunken bops, imagine what someone could achieve with a major label's support.

None


"That should've been us," Melissa says, "and they gave it to [Kesha]. Once I saw her doing our thing — and even Katy Perry was doing the same, just a cleaner version — it was like, Damn, why did they choose those other girls and not the Millionaires? Was it because we were scene and sorta goth-y? It was disappointing, definitely, but that made us try harder — it fueled our fire."

---

None


The Millionaires started in late 2007 with a Mac desktop, Garageband, and plenty of Smirnoff Ice (they were all under 21). "We went to a Catholic high school [in California], and my mom had bought us the Mac for Christmas to use for school," Melissa says. "One day we all made a song randomly — drunk, wasted — just screaming and yelling at the computer to record on Garageband." That belligerent recording became "I Like Money," the first official Millionaires demo that they'd later upload to Myspace. Using pre-made Garageband beats, the debut effort knowingly lacked in production value, but the girls' lyrical wit made up for its DIY sound. The verses were biting ("High heels, makeup, fake eyelashes/ Look at you, you're so damn plastic"), and the hook was addictive ("Look over here, and let me see that body rock").

None


None


None


"The lyrics were easy for us," Melissa says. "They came naturally. You didn't want to get in a fight with us because we were all really good with our words. We could've been wrong, but with all the hate, we were so quick to make someone feel stupid for talking shit."

None


The Millionaires' early bedroom sessions continued with a lineup of demos that solidified their smart, raunchy approach to making hilarious electro-pop. "In My Bed" saw the trio demanding a boy hop in their bed: "I know you must be shy because I'm just so hot/ But if you will just try, I know you'll hit the spot." On "Hey Rich Boy," the Millionaires offered a sugar baby anthem: "You can tell he's drippin' dollars, so of course I have to holler." They made a track called "Hoe Down," packed with banjos and drags, but the release of "Alcohol" marked when the Millionaires really hit their stride. It became the band's mission statement, with a chorus that everyone on Myspace knew the words to: "Let's get fucked up! Gimme that Alcohol (A-L-C-O-H-O-L)."

None


When the Millionaires uploaded these rough tracks to Myspace, they quickly caught fire, cultivating millions of streams. "No one realized that Myspace was such a great promotional tool at the time," Melissa says. "This was before people really caught on to social media being free publicity." The group almost immediately shifted from being a silly side project into a pursuit that felt like it could become something big. "It happened really fast," she says. "Because our first song did so well and it was so easy to make, we realized we were able to make a lot of songs. And when we realized people wanted us to perform, that's when we had to get a DJ."


None


They enlisted the help of DJ Hyphy Crunk, who was a friend of Melissa's and a local Los Angeles promoter at the time. "He would let us into clubs, and he was one of the only DJs I knew," Melissa says, recounting their simple, fast solutions to seem more legit to fans. "Hyphy Crunk, spin that shit," became a recognizable sample across Millionaires' early music, and he'd spin their tracks at live shows. "All three of us [in the Millionaires] were classically trained ballet dancers, so that's how we clicked really well [on stage]. A lot of bands, and especially scene kids as you can imagine back then, were super shy but we were the opposite. We loved the stage, and we were drinkers and partiers, so it fit."

None


Performing their songs live meant the Millionaires needed to rerecord everything they'd already created. "We weren't sound engineers," Melissa admits, so all their demos had been compressed without saving any stems. "We redid a bunch of songs because the recordings sounded so bad, and we only had the one tape. We had to, or else we couldn't perform them live. That's when we started taking it really seriously."

---

None


Melissa's high school sweetheart and prom date was Miley Cyrus' older brother Trace. He happened to be a guitarist for the pop-punk band best known for its breakthrough hit "Shake It," Metro Station, which played an indirect role the Millionaires' success. Keyboardist Blake Healy's roommate, Mark Maxwell, was a burgeoning producer and eager to work closely on developing a music project. Having met Melissa through Metro Station, he remixed two of the Millionaires' early demos, and ended up completely transforming their discography.


None


"When Blake took off with Metro Station, Mark had a feeling of being left out of the action," Melissa says, "and I think he saw an opportunity in us to achieve the same." The producer helped develop the Millionaires' sound into a much fuller fusion of wonky electro synths with radio-pop sensibility. This ultimately led to their first proper release, the five-track Bling Bling Bling! EP, released in 2007. The cover art featured all three girls in American Apparel bikini tops and wearing thick, charcoal eyeliner, surrounded by stacks of hundred dollar bills.

None


Metro Station was then working with Crush Management, the team responsible for shaping the success of still-massive bands like Fall Out Boy and Panic! at the Disco. "We sought out legit management because we had this one lady who really fucked us over," Dani says. "[Crush] wanted to work with us, and they flew us out to NYC to record more music." With celebrities like Brendon Urie and Pete Wentz under their wing, Crush had the power and momentum to make Melissa, Allison and Dani superstars.

None


Around this time, the band was invited to perform live on TRL's "On the Radar" — easily their biggest opportunity to date, and a chance to get their music legitimized outside of Myspace. "We randomly got an email [from TRL], and started freaking out," Melissa says. "They made us fly ourselves out, and my mom went into her savings to send all three of us. It was during our first week of tour; I remember we had to play two shows in LA, and then go to NYC three days later. We flew overnight, got to New York at 6 AM, and had to go straight to filming. I'd lost my voice."

None


None


The girls decided to perform a track called "I Move It," which was their safest lyrically but still overflowing with profanities. "[MTV was] so upset about the song, because they give you one time to practice and we all cussed," Melissa laughs, remembering that producers threatened to cut the performance altogether if they didn't clean it up. "We had to change the lyrics, and we were so stressed," Dani says. "Because if you accidentally slip up, there's hell to pay." Somehow they all managed, and made their mainstream TV debut "looking trashy in tour clothes," with teased jet-black hair and bracelets stacked up their arms, all gifted by fans at different shows. "The minute we did TRL, I think that made [the band] seem really real to us and a lot of people," Dani says.

None


It also opened up them to a whole new avenue of music-making; the Millionaires were tapped to create theme songs for MTV's hit shows A Double Shot at Love with the Ikki twins and Teen Cribs, and later invited to cover Chic's 1978 hit "Le Freak" for the MTV film Turn the Beat Around. Many of the the girls' existing tracks were also used for the network's shows, including "Alcohol" on Skins. Their quick, rebellious wit was perfect for reality TV's debauchery, and the lyrics immediate enough to have impact in only a few, short seconds of play.

None


Related | Brendon Urie: 'This Is Me Coming Out as Pansexual'

None


Building upon this organic momentum, their Just Got Paid, Let's Get Laid EP (off Decaydance Records), showed signs that the Millionaires could become America's next big girl group. They strategically included their biggest tracks, "Alcohol" and "I Like Money," and unveiled several new songs written after that first boozy but brilliant recording session. "Talk Shit" was an aggressive message to the haters, staking their ground with fists ready to fight: "Money, diamonds, gold and ice/ Yeah, talk shit you'll pay the price/ Shut up cunt, I'll cut your tongue/ Back down, bitch, you're fucking done." On "I Move It," the Millionaires continued carving out space as DGAF sex symbols, while the title track was a massive party bus banger that poked fun at the criticism they received online: "We live the life you wish, bitch don't say shit/ No talent, just lucky, but they still wanna fuck me."


None


In their "Just Got Paid, Let's Get Laid" video, the Millionaires featured a girl dressed up as fellow Myspace scene queen Audrey Kitching, who'd previously insulted the bands' music online. Twirling her pastel pink hair with a septum piercing and matching moles, Kitching's look-alike said the Millionaires were "like totally ruining music." The real Kitching eventually addressed the mockery on Twitter: "I'm embarrassed for you guys," she wrote. "Getting '****** up'? Degrading to all girls" — a criticism that would erupt in backlash today. Ever ahead of their time, the Millionaires couldn't care less as they walked men on leashes, feeding them bowls of champagne like thirsty kittens and tossing cash at half-naked strippers in the video. "You think you'll get famous taking pictures for free? Think again, bitch, maybe you should do it like me," growled Dani on the track.

---

None


Being an A-List Myspace group and working with Crush Management, the Millionaires became closely associated with all the emo bands dominating music at the time. They were the Paris, Nicky and Nicole of scene culture, and therefore joining Warped Tour seemed unavoidable to keep the band's momentum going. Consistent with punk's historic misogyny, the summer-long festival was always stacked with male musicians, putting the Millionaires in front of rockist crowds that vocally — and sometimes violently — hated their music.

None


They shared a tour bus with a group called Brokencyde, which incorporated hip-hop beats with screamo vocals and was similarly loathed by the Warped Tour audience for the ways they modernized punk music. On the first day of tour, Melissa says someone threw an entire water bottle of cum on Brokencyde's brand new stage backdrop, completely destroying it. "I remember joking that Target should sponsor us and put their logo on our bus, so people could throw stuff at that instead," she says. "No one else would tour with us, it was so dangerous. Jeffree [Star] had his own bus for that reason too, because he didn't trust anybody. It was like lunchtime in high school: [the Millionaires], Brokencyde and Jeffree all sitting at a table. It got to a point where no one would talk to us."

None


"Looking back now, what we were doing was really feminist and badass."

None


Throughout the summer, the Millionaires were forced to move stages several times because the bands before them would rile up the audience by openly insulting the trio. "We were always sandwiched between the two hardest, heavy metal bands because of the layouts of the stages," Melissa says. "That was really dangerous cause people in the audience would throw stuff." Dani remembers being hit in the head with shoes, water bottles and full bags of fruit; Melissa says she was once sexually violated. "People couldn't handle us, especially men," Dani says. "Our sets would infuriate them." As the Millionaires rapped about hooking up and downing shots, they did full choreography, sometimes simulating sex acts with each other. It was a completely different vibe and message from the ferocious, guitar-driven bands that they performed alongside.

None


At one Tennessee Warped Tour date, the Millionaires were booked to perform with A Day To Remember, a band whose sound was critically referred to as "pop-mosh." The girls begged not to do it ("They're going to eat us alive"), but were forced into playing the show by management. As expected, the response to their music was riotous: dollar bills were tossed about as if they were strippers, girlfriends in the crowd didn't like that their boyfriends were watching ("that was always a big issue for us"), and insults were freely flung at the stage. "They had to stop our set because it was getting so crazy," Dani says. "Even the sound guy was talking shit to us. I remember yelling at this guy, who was calling us 'sluts.' It was really intense, and we were always just trying to have fun and make fun songs. Looking back now, what we were doing was really feminist and badass."

None


None


The musical landscape at the time was overwhelmingly patriarchal, with all-male (and usually all-white) bands taking up the most space: All Time Low, Forever the Sickest Kids, We The Kings, The Maine, Cartel, Mayday Parade, The Cab, Cute Is What We Aim For, Boys Like Girls... the list is endless, meaning the majority of lyrics were penned through a male gaze: melodramatic love songs written about women, by men. While A Day To Remember, for example, was singing earnestly about romance and, in many cases, monogamy ("I just feel complete when you're by my side"), the Millionaires were destroying the standard by independently owning their sexuality, batting men around like toys, and setting it all to trashy club beats: "In the Millionaire world shit's turned around/ It's the boys that drop their knees to the ground," they declare on "Just Got Paid, Let's Get Laid" — a much-needed role reversal in the age of emo masculinity.

---

None


When the Millionaires got offered to sign to UK record label B-Unique in 2009, it was both the height of the band's career and the final nail in its coffin. They were slated to release a debut, full-length studio album, complete with new material that would push them further into the world of more accessible dance-pop. In a feature on The Guardian's "New Band of the Week," the UK publication profiled the Millionaires and asked the question, "Trash-pop or pop that's trash?" The hate the group experienced on and offline was reaching new, unbearable extremes — especially for Dani, who remembers battling an ongoing cocktail of depression, mental breakdowns and frequent panic attacks.

None


Related | Does 3OH!3 Regret 'Don't Trust Me'?

None


"It was hard on me in particular," Dani says. "I didn't realize at the time how much it was affecting me. I didn't know what the term 'empath' was, but now I do and I realize I'm totally one. Negative energies affect me in a crazy way, so it was really difficult being on stage." She also didn't want to stay in the UK, arguing that the people who booked the group's shows consistently put them in "weird situations where the audience wasn't receptive. They didn't know exactly where to put us or what to do with us."

None


So Dani decided to quit the band for good and return to the US. "It was so hard being away from home," she admits. This, however, meant the Millionaires lost their UK record deal and had to scrap their full-length project as the original trio. "I was happy to come back to the US, because things were not going well [overseas]," Dani says. "We were all trying to make it work, but I was like, I can't go back on stage. It was too much for me; I was relieved to not go back, but at the same time it was sad. There were a lot of fun times, and [Melissa and Allison] were like sisters to me. It took a while to come to terms with everything, but I think it was best for me at the time."


None


Shortly after Dani's announcement in 2010, Melissa and Allison released their Cash Only EP as the Millionaires, which featured some of the group's strongest, most sexual work to date. It offered five new songs, many of which the girls recorded in New York City while they were still together. All three sang more than ever on the project, attempting to compete with their peers in a post-Kesha pop landscape.

None


"Middle finger in the air if you're pussy's tight," Melissa and Allison demanded on track one, "Party Like a Millionaire" — the first Millionaires track without Dani's involvement. On "Prom Dress," recorded before her departure, the girls took on the challenge of writing a high school party bop, complete with cheerleader cries and an explosive power-pop chorus: "Get me off like a prom dress/ I can feel you deep inside," they sang in unison. "Take Your Shirt Off" continued in this playfully erotic vein, while "Microphone" was their attempt at reclaiming the groupie narrative: "After the show/ No one will ever know/ I want to touch your microphone."

None


Nothing was as promising as "Stay the Night," a single that had just enough sex appeal to feel like they weren't selling out, while still leaning into a safer, more radio-friendly lane. With retro guitar-pop production, the Millionaires' lyrics were PG-13, if not intentionally innocent: "Let's get naughty, cause I want you to stay the night," they sang on the chorus — a bright, bubbly climax that could've easily passed the standards of TRL's buttoned-up producers a few years prior. In the music video, the girls choose three lovers from a house full of men, handing the chosen ones a message in a bottle that read, "Stay the night with me."


None


"I love 'Stay the Night,'" Melissa says. "That one was kind of cleaner for us, but we really wanted to go that route. We recorded it in Europe, and it was going to do really well there."

None


The scrapped full-length album from Melissa, Allison and Dani meant losing a sea of impeccable, unreleased tracks that'd been circulating online. "Up in My Bubble" was a perfectly bitchy bop, featuring vocals by hitmaker Sarah Hudson (of Ultraviolet Sound); "Painted Whore" took shots at girls in too much makeup ("put more on you fuckin' clown"); Belinda Carlisle's "Heaven Is a Place on Earth" got sampled on "The One" — a tender track about true love and dependency, much like another slept-on standout, "Martinis and Mixed Feelings." While they never saw a proper release, all these songs exist today as lo-fi rips on YouTube and Soundcloud pages curated by dedicated fans who recognize the Millionaires as internet relics demanding preservation.

---

None


Once Dani left, Melissa says she and Allison were able to focus more on their potential as sisters, and continued forward with the Millionaires, now a two-person band. "We just decided to move on," she says, admittedly writing a Dani takedown called "Not Everyone Is a Millionaire," and then shelving it ("It was too mean.") The pair worked hard to keep up with music trends in order to be taken seriously. "The 'Kesha thing' was so popular, and we felt we could still compete with that as a duo. We were trying to find our own way in, and started to pull from our Asian [heritage]. Still to this day, the only [Asian-American] group that ever made it to Billboard was Far East Movement [of 'Like a G6' fame]."

None


Related | Before She Was Famous, Nicki Minaj Rapped on This Jeffree Star Song

None


Their 2012 single, "Drinks On Me," attempted to build upon the success of "Alcohol" by adding trendy, EDM motifs and sounds to their original party animal formula: "Give me that Andre/ 4 Loko erday / Give me that UV/ Cheap alcohol, please." This led to Melissa and Allison's debut mixtape Your Girl Does Party the same year — a 16-track effort stacked with cameos from hip-hop artists including Kreayshawn,Trina and Shanell — as well as their official full-length album, Tonight (produced by Khris Lorenz), in 2013.

None


While their tipsy, carefree attitude was disruptive in 2007, it'd become commonplace five years later. Between "Crazy Kids" and "C'Mon," any song off Kesha's Warrior could've easily been a Millionaires track; "Bass Down Low," DEV's The Cataracts-assisted hit sounded like a major label version of anything off Just Got Paid, Let's Get Laid. The Guardian had previously referred to the Millionaires as "Kesha to the max," when at least chronologically, it was the other way around.


None


Meanwhile, Dani began slowly stepping back into music through a collaborative project with Asia Whiteacre, who's now signed to Warner Chappell and notably co-wrote Hailee Steinfeld's Zedd-produced smash "Starving." Dani and Asia's indie band, Mr. Downstairs, was starkly different from the Millionaires, with completely sung-through, self-serious songs, more personal subject matter and guitar-led, bedroom-pop production. The duo acquired a small but engaged following and created a few music videos to cultish acclaim. They even dropped a 2012 EP called Superhero Heart, but the timing wasn't right for them to keep things going.

None


"I didn't have the resources," Dani says. "At the time, I was moving out on my own. We were paying for a practice space, but neither of us could afford it. We didn't have a manager anymore, so I was like, Shit, I don't know what to do."

None


She adds, "People still ask me, 'What ever happened to Mr. Downstairs?'" But all that is in the past, as now she's focused on an entirely new project she created with a clear head, fresh sound and newfound independence. SnowBlood is Dani's first solo effort, which she's been quietly developing for years in California. She released her self-titled album as SnowBlood in 2017, and dropped a spacey, electro-pop cover of Bananarama's "Venus" last year. This summer, she'll be going on tour in support of Mystery Skulls — her first time ever performing a full set alone. "Somebody the other day was sending me videos of Millionaires on Warped Tour," Dani says, "And that was literally 10 years ago. So 10 years later, I'm finally playing as a solo artist. I'm so stoked."

None


Related | Bring Back Emo in 2019

None


Capitalizing on her understanding of the internet, Melissa — now based in Arizona — has become something of a social media expert in the cannabis industry and is working on her own solo music. "I know what works and I know what sells," she says. "Even if don't know what the product is, I know how to sell it. I already know how to sell a band, because [the Millionaires] always toured with excellent musicians. That's where a lot of the hate came from — the fact that were were screaming at computers, and still able to be successful."

None


She and Allison have continued to work together, starring briefly on the Oxygen network's unscripted Bad Girls Club and making appearances at nostalgia-fueled emo-themed parties. Melissa's been married (and divorced), while Allison is settling into life as a newlywed in Las Vegas with her partner of 10 years. Their lives have slowed down, but their legacies live on: "Still to this day, if I go into a Hot Topic or a grocery store, people will still see me as a Millionaire," Melissa says — a testament to the cultural impact of a band whose star shined bright, despite never reaching supernova.


None


Warped Tour/TRL photos courtesy of Getty / Photobooth photos courtesy of Dani Artaud

]]>
Thu, 18 Apr 2019 21:22:51 +0000http://www.nojx.tw/millionaires-kesha-myspace-2634994820.htmlMillionairesKeshaMelissa marieMyspaceAllison greenDani artaudWarped tourSceneEmoPanic at the discoFall out boy#20ninesceneJustin Moran
Notre Dame and the Racial Bias of Charitable Givinghttp://www.nojx.tw/notre-dame-donations-louisiana-churches-2634993089.html

800-year-old Notre Dame Cathedral fell amidst large and uncontrollable flames, the entire world mourned. No one could believe that one of the most famous sites in the world would be in jeopardy of being burned to ashes on an otherwise regular Tuesday afternoon. We weren't sure if the descriptions of Notre Dame would now be confined to those of Victor Hugo, Sigmund Freud, or our personal and collective memories. What would happen to the artwork, the artifacts, or the iconic stained glass rose window? Would Paris, still reeling from the 2015 terror attacks that killed 130 people — the deadliest since World War II — be the same again?

None


Miraculously, Parisian firefighters saved many of the prized artifacts artworks and relics housed in the church, including what some believe to be the Crown of Thorns worn by Jesus — and they only had 66 minutes to do so. But nevertheless, Notre Dame needed to be restored as soon as possible. Approximately thirteen million people a year visit Notre Dame, and therefore its damage is both a cultural and financial blow to French tourism. In less than 72 hours, France's three richest families, including the Pinaults, the Arnaults and the Bettencourt Meyers pledged $650 million for its restoration.

None


This goodwill of international outpouring would have been astounding, if the news had not been embittered by the fact that three historically Black churches were burned in a southern Louisiana parish in a suspected hate crime over a 10 day period in March, to which initially very little mainstream media attention was paid. The overlap in burning churches—one grown out of racial hatred and the other an accident — and the quick attention and giving to the latter reopened a deeply entrenched colonial wound, reminding us once again the world is less sympathetic to Black people and our institutions.

None


Related | Fashion Houses Are Pitching in to Rebuild Notre Dame

None


Yes, Notre Dame is a world famous site and it generates millions for France. No, millions of people do not travel to Opelousas in St. Landry Parish to snap selfies and attend the services at Greater Union Baptist, St. Mary Baptist, and Mount Pleasant. But these churches are still sacred. Even as donations pour in to Notre Dame, the French government body created a fundraising campaign to accrue more money for its restoration. According to Krupali Krusche, Associate Dean at the University of Notre Dame School of Architecture and expert on historical preservation, the nearly $800 million from donations would provide for a "good" preservation while an expert one could potentially demand a billion dollars.

None


Just yesterday, April 17, the New York Post reported that the pledges from companies such as Apple and magnates from L'Oreal, Chanel, and Dior, alongside Catholics and those around the world have led to the amount of money rising to $995 million. Why then does the French government still have their fundraising campaign live? France is one of the world's largest economies with a nominal GDP of over 2.5 trillion dollars. The Vatican, which bankers estimate to be worth somewhere between 10 to 15 billion dollars, also agreed to help with the efforts.

Online, many pointed out that France received compensation for the Haitian revolution: in order for Haiti, a former French colony, to maintain its independence and freedom from slavery, its people had to pay France what would be worth $21 billion back in 1825. No standing French president has opened up the possibility to repay Haiti for this injustice. While France remains wealthy, Haiti remains the poorest country in the Western hemisphere.

None


The three historically Black churches that burned in Louisiana (another formerly French territory) were almost eclipsed by the news of Notre Dame. President Trump gave his condolences to Macron and offered help to restore Notre Dame yet has not made one public announcement about the hate crimes brewing in Opelousas. Given that he rose to power by capitalizing on the fears and racial animus of white Americans, his silence is unsurprising, but the optics are still damning and painful.

President Macron also hasn't given any condolences to the historic churches that burned in Louisiana. Like Notre Dame, those three churches were also sacred places full of collective memory. Much of their history was lost, including a sixty-year-old Bible and "handwritten sermons, financial records, and documents" that are well over 100 years old. Much African American history has been passed down from generation to generation through oral histories and storytelling; any documentation of such a vulnerable yet surviving people of our society is important to maintain. Right there in Opelousas, those archives have been scorched — a void in our historical memory is now in its place.

None


Fortunately, donations of well over a million dollars have been reached for the historic Black churches. Many outlets have reported that the Notre Dame Cathedral burning inspired the spike in fundraising. However, these church burnings happened several days prior to Notre Dame, the last one on April 4. France was able to receive close to a billion within three days. St. Landry Parish received a .001% of that in two weeks. The disparity between who and what gets the most sympathy, media attention, and charitable giving is glaring.

None


Compounded with the lack of parallels between how one religious site takes precedence over another when its very existence is in jeopardy, the quickness with which a billion dollars can be raised sheds light on other issues: world hunger, insurmountable student loan debt, homelessness, food deserts. Currently in France, members of the Yellow Vest Movement are protesting against rising social and economic inequality. No one can tell any person who or where to spend their money, but the pattern of prioritizing Western art and architecture in predominantly white spaces with capital and sympathy is consistent.

None


Though the three Black churches in Louisiana are nowhere near as large as Notre Dame and therefore won't demand as much money for its restorative processes, the immediate worldwide response to support Notre Dame cathedral from laymen to heads of state, was like a roar against a whisper of the Louisiana church burnings. The cumulative benevolence carries a dark side, that Black history in public landscapes can be destroyed and close to forgotten. There needs to be a constant awareness of the racial bias towards who and what deserves our time, energy, and mourning and why these elements maintain a hierarchy in which white people and their institutions remain at top of the caste system.

None


Photo via Getty

]]>
Thu, 18 Apr 2019 21:15:24 +0000http://www.nojx.tw/notre-dame-donations-louisiana-churches-2634993089.htmlBlack churchesLouisiana churchesNotre dameMorgan Jerkins
BRB, Buying: Prada Spring 2019http://www.nojx.tw/prada-spring-2019-shopping-guide-2633811766.html

In BRB, Buying, PAPER takes a look at this season's top collections to show you how to wear and, most importantly, where to buy them. Below, Fashion Director Mia Solkin reimagines Prada spring 2019, which is available now on prada.com.

None


Technical Jacquard TrousersTechnical Jacquard Jacket

None


Cloqué Hat With Ear FlapsPrint Jersey Dress

None


Jacquard Mouliné HatNappa Leather JacketPrint Jersey Top

None


Technical Jacquard TrousersTechnical Jacquard JacketNylon Hat With Ear FlapsCloqué Hat With Ear FlapsPrada Sidonie Leather Shoulder BagPrint Jersey DressJacquard Mouliné HatNappa Leather JacketTechnical Jersey Skirt With RuchingPrint Jersey TopPatent Leather SlingbacksPatent Leather Pointy Toe PumpsPrada Panier Medium BagPrada Panier Medium BagKnit Fabric Pointy Toe Pumps

None


Technical Jacquard JacketNylon Hat With Ear FlapsTechnical Jacquard TrousersPrada Panier Medium BagPatent Leather Pointy Toe PumpsPrada Sidonie Leather Shoulder BagCloqué Hat With Ear FlapsJacquard Mouliné HatPrada Panier Medium BagPatent Leather SlingbacksPrint Jersey TopPrint Jersey DressTechnical Jersey Skirt With RuchingKnit Fabric Pointy Toe PumpsNappa Leather Jacket

None


Cloqué Hat With Ear FlapsPrada Sidonie Leather Shoulder BagPrint Jersey Dress

None


Cloqué Jacket With Floral MotifShort-Sleeved Fabric TopPrada Margit Leather Shoulder Bag

None


Jacquard Mouliné HatTechnical Jersey Skirt With RuchingPrada Panier Medium BagNappa Leather JacketPrint Jersey Top

None


Fashion Director: Mia Solkin
Photography: Tom Newton
Digi Tech: Xavier Scott Marshall
Makeup: Caitlin Wooters (using MAKE UP FOR EVER at Art Department)
Hair: Clara Leonard
Hair Assistant: Aziza Rasulova
Stylist: Chelsea Volpe
Stylist Assistant: Jarrod William
Nails: Sunny Han
Studio: Monaliza Studios
Models: Sarah Marie, Marlee Bell, Brianna Russo









]]>
Wed, 17 Apr 2019 14:42:09 +0000http://www.nojx.tw/prada-spring-2019-shopping-guide-2633811766.htmlPradaFashionPhotography Tom Newton / Styling Chelsea Volpe
Kylie Jenner: Get Rich or Die Followinghttp://www.nojx.tw/kylie-jenner-transformation-2629088275.html

Kylie Jenner knows we've all wondered out loud who her plastic surgeon is. She just doesn't care. Once one of the more unassuming members of America's most famous family, these days her arched eyebrows and permanently pouted lips — sculpted and painted according to the impossible ratios of beauty YouTube and augmented reality apps — transfix hundreds of millions of eager fans and are ubiquitous on every feed. The 21-year-old makeup mogul says her dramatic transformation (from private teenager to public businesswoman, from demure girl-next-door to bombshell) was a conscious one, and more considered than you might assume. She's happy to talk about it.

None


Related | Katy Perry: Outside the Box

None


"People think I fully went under the knife and completely reconstructed my face, which is completely false," she explains to me over the phone, casually and with little prompting. "I'm terrified! I would never. They don't understand what good hair and makeup and, like, fillers, can really do." I'm eager to indulge in the fantasy that anyone can look like Kylie Jenner if they just watch enough tutorials about crease application, and tell her as much. She gently interrupts. "I mean, no," she says with a conspiratorial laugh. "It's fillers. I'm not denying that."

None


None


On Instagram, where she reigns supreme, Jenner comes across as coy. Her captions are minimal, her grid curated, her selfies serious. In conversation, though, she's surprisingly relaxed and generous and upfront. A cool girl with fillers in her face who is down for whatever. She's genuinely excited to discuss her formerly secret daughter Stormi, and says young motherhood has changed life entirely for the better. "It's genuinely what I wanted... to be a young mom," she says. "I thought, This I what I want to do, and if people accept it or don't accept it then I'm okay with every outcome."

None


Two days before our interview, she recalls, the 11-month-old took her first steps — with father Travis Scott present. Jenner gushes about him, too. He's a great dad, a "big kid," a fantastic partner. To put rumors to rest, they aren't married yet, or even engaged. Don't expect her to keep something like that a secret. When it happens, and she seems certain it will soon, "I'll let everybody know." With Kylie, you can usually expect fanfare. A few weeks after we speak, she throws an overtly aesthetic Astroworld-themed birthday celebration for Stormi, involving elaborate Instagrammable neon photo backdrops and custom merch in pop up stalls. Guests enter through the mouth of a giant balloon in the shape of her daughter's face. They eat fries from pink cartons covered in Louis Vuitton-Stormi monograms. DJ Khaled, in attendance, gifts one-year-old Stormi her very first Chanel bag.

None


"What I'm trying to say is I did have a platform, but none of my money is inherited."

None


Now that we've got the plastic surgery slash secret pregnancy talk out of the way, what Jenner really wants to discuss, with the authority of the eldest girl at the slumber party, is makeup. Its mysterious power. Makeup has made her unfathomably wealthy, and has given her purpose and identity outside of the Keeping Up With the Kardashians sphere. She's in awe of the famous makeup artists she is privileged to regularly work with and laments the fact she'll never be as good as they are, exuding way more modesty than is necessary — watch any of her "getting ready" tutorials and feel something at least proximate to awe. Even before it became her business, she explains, lipstick was her almost singular hobby, an "obsession" she didn't necessarily intend to monetize at first. Of the now-iconic lip kits that started it all, Jenner says she never did any consumer research, "wasn't educated on what the beauty business really was," and never even stopped to observe what the big brands were putting in drugstores. She simply "followed her heart" and invented the exact product she wanted to buy.

None


None


None


None


None


None


None


None


"I just knew for myself as a customer, like, why am I buying a lip liner and a different lipstick? I wanted it the same color, I wanted it to be easy," she recalls. "And I really spent every last dime that I had starting it, not even knowing if it would be successful."

None


In 2018, when Forbes predicted Jenner would be crowned America's youngest self-made billionaire within a year, the Internet understandably bristled. But while Jenner definitely exhibits the blithe financial attitude her detractors would expect ("I don't define myself by how much I have. I honestly don't wake up even thinking about it") she is able to acknowledge how certain Kardashian-related privileges gave Kylie Cosmetics an edge other fledgling beauty brands would kill for. "I had such a huge platform, I had so many followers already and I had so many people watching me," she admits. Still, she's eager to assert that "the self-made thing is true." Her parents "cut her off at the age of 15" and told her to start making her own way, and Jenner says that since then she hasn't received a single cent.

None


"My parents told me I needed to make my own money, it's time to learn how to save and spend your own money, stuff like that," she explains, taking her time to think through the statement. "What I'm trying to say is I did have a platform, but none of my money is inherited."

None


"Makeup is something that makes me feel empowered, makes me feel good, and I think it's such a positive thing."

None


Jenner has been trying to curb her social media use, lately. Her screen time has "been going down 20 percent" each week, according to an app on her phone. But she also knows that social media is her "advertisement, the way I show my products." She doesn't feel guilty about exposing her young followers to a filtered vision of beauty that apparently requires millions, close to billions, of dollars to achieve; isn't losing sleep over the occasional piece of diet pill sponcon. Just hopes fans know that she's "trying to set a good example." The pursuit of prettiness has enriched her life, and she believes it can help others, too. When a woman's reflection matches the mental image she holds of herself, Jenner's transfixing, selfie-laden success story seems to imply, she is free to go forth and conquer.

None


"Makeup is something that makes me feel empowered, makes me feel good, and I think it's such a positive thing," she says, with an earnestness that's nothing if not compelling. "There's no harm in playing around with it and feeling good about yourself." Maybe the fillers are optional, after all.

None


Click Here to Order Katy Perry's Transformation Issue

None


Photography: Morelli Brothers
Styling: Anna Trevelyan
Hair: Tokyo Stylez
Makeup: Ariel Tejada
Nails: Lily Jafari
Styling Assistants: Ryan Dodson and Karissa Mitchell
Production: AGPNYC





]]>
Tue, 19 Feb 2019 12:58:25 +0000http://www.nojx.tw/kylie-jenner-transformation-2629088275.htmlKylie jennerBeautyTransformationKim kardashianTravis scottStory Katherine Gillespie / Photography Morelli Brothers / Styling Anna Trevelyan
11选5出号精准规律